Additional Specific Disability Documentation Guidelines:

Hearing Impairments & Deafness

  • Documentation must be in the form of a medical report or physician's letter. An audiological report must also be submitted.
  • An audiologist or other appropriate medical physician should perform medical diagnosis.

Medical Conditions & Physical Impairments

  • Documentation must be in the form of either a medical report or physician's letter.
  • Medical diagnosis must be made by an appropriate physician qualified to make the diagnosis.

Psychological & Psychiatric Disabilities

  • Documentation must be in the form of a psychological report or a neuropsychological report.
  • A psychologist, psychiatrist, or licensed mental health practitioner should make the diagnosis.
  • There must be specific diagnostic criteria found in the American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV).

Speech Impairments

  • Documentation must be in the form of a report or physician's letter.
  • A speech pathologist or other appropriate medical physician should do the diagnosis.

Visual Impairments & Blindness

  • Documentation must be in the form of a report or a physician's letter.
  • An ophthalmologist or other appropriate medical physician should do the diagnosis.

Learning Disabilities

  • Documentation must be in the form of a psychoeducational or neuropsychological report.
  • The learning disability documentation must include a specific diagnosed learning disability.
  • Documentation should include measures of the following domains:
    1. Aptitude: The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) is the preferred instrument.
    2. Achievement: Current levels of academic functioning in all aspects of reading, mathematics, and written language are required. The Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) is NOT a comprehensive measure of achievement and is therefore UNACCEPTABLE.
    3. Information Processing and Communication Assessments: Information processing should be addressed, for example: verbal expression and memory; receptive language; sequential memory; auditory and visual perception processing and processing speed; and fine motor functioning.
    4. Psychological Assessment/Personality Testing: Although not required, testing, such as the MMPI, may be done in addition to the three domains already mentioned.
    5. Neuropsychological Assessment: Although not required, more extensive testing, such as the Halstead-Reitan Battery and the Luria-Nebraska Battery, may be done in addition to the domains already mentioned.

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

  • Show evidence that anxiety disorders, disorders of depression, mood disorder, schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, dissassociative disorder, or substance-related disorders are not the primary disability and are not the primary cause of AD/HD.
  • Standardized assessment measures should be utilized in the diagnosis of AD/HD; i.e., T.O.V.A., Continuous Performance Test, neuropsychological evaluation.
  • Report should include a history of AD/HD symptoms by the age of seven, corroborated by another independent source.
  • Corroboration of current AD/HD symptoms across multiple settings by one or more adults with knowledge of the client's functioning should be documented.
  • Documentation on two rating scales of AD/HD behaviors/symptoms that have appropriate age norms (i.e., rating scales for childhood and adult behavior.)
  • Show evidence of interference of AD/HD with appropriate academic or social functioning.