Clinical Programs

Children and Families Clinic (6 credits)

Students enrolled in the Children and Families Clinic will primarily represent children who are charged in delinquency court.  Delinquency cases are the juvenile equivalent of adult criminal cases. Students will litigate the cases start to finish including: detention advocacy, probable cause hearings, depositions, tactual investigation, legal research, working with experts, writing and arguing substantive motions and dispositions. Qualified students must be certified under the Florida Student Practice Rule, Chapter 11 Florida Rules Regulating Admission to the Bar. Once accepted into the clinic, your CLI application will be processed. 

The substantive law covered in this course includes criminal and juvenile procedure, constitutional law, juvenile law, professional responsibility, evidence, and education law. The skills taught include legal research, legal writing, client interviewing, client counseling, negotiations, oral and written advocacy, case theory development, legal analysis, strategic planning, factual investigation, critical self-reflection, and some case management. Each case will be broken into its smallest components, and the students will be expected to pursue and consider as many legal, factual, ethical, and strategic issues as time permits.

To enroll in the Children and Families Clinic, students must have completed four semesters and 48 credit hours. The prerequisites for this course are Criminal Law, Evidence and Professional Responsibility. Recommended courses prior to taking this course include Advanced Legal Writing, Children & the Law, Criminal Procedure and Trial Advocacy. Your Notice of Registrant Clearance from the Florida Bar must accompany the completed application.
The Children and Families Clinic is six credit hours. The students will be required to commit to a minimum of approximately twenty hours per week.  Clinic students appear in court on a regular basis. These hours would include the time spent in court, meeting with faculty, classroom attendance, and case preparation. The students will meet in a class for three hours every week. Students in groups of two also will be required to meet with their faculty supervisor once a week for at least an hour to review the status and progress of individual cases. Finally, the students will be required to commit to additional hours each week for client contact purposes. The remaining hours will be fulfilled each week preparing for class and the cases and in individual meetings with the supervising faculty to prepare for significant stages of the case.

In addition to these weekly hours during the semester, the students who enroll will be required to attend a pre-semester orientation to be held in the week prior to the start of classes. This orientation will provide an intensive review of some of the substantive and procedural law to be used in the clinic course, review some of the special client issues presented by these cases, and lead students in some simulated exercises relevant to the cases.

Students who have questions about the Children and Families Clinic are welcome to contact Professor Katherine Puzone at 407-681-5403 or at kpuzone@barry.edu.

Environmental and Earth Law Clinic (6 credits)

This is a one-semester course focused on developing the skills used in an environmental law practice.  While litigation is an important tool in addressing some environmental concerns, lasting resolutions are usually achieved through negotiation and consensus-building. 

Students participating in this clinic will develop an understanding about the interrelationship among environmental laws, regulations and permits by assessing environmental conditions impacting individuals and communities and working with clients to assess their legal options.  Students will also learn client development skills by working with the clinic director to identify environmentally impacted communities within the region and organizations or individuals within those communities who may require or benefit from legal assistance.

Students must have completed three semesters and 36 credit hours to participate in this course.  Prerequisites for this course are Professional Responsibility and Environmental Law (can be taken concurrently).  The Environmental Law, Jurisprudence and Justice Seminar is recommended. 

Students who have questions about the Environmental and Earth Law Clinic are welcome to contact Professor Rachel Deming at 407-681-5422 or at rdeming@barry.edu.

Immigration Clinic (6 credits)

Students enrolled in the Immigration Clinic will primarily represent non-citizens seeking immigration benefits or defending against removal proceedings before the Department of Homeland Security or the Executive Office for Immigration Review (federal administrative agencies).  Students do not need to be certified under the Florida Student Practice Rule, Chapter 11 Florida Rules Regulating Admission to the Bar, in order to participate fully in the clinic, but may wish to obtain that certification for their future use.

The substantive law covered in this course includes immigration law, professional responsibility, and evidence.  Skills taught will likely include client interviewing, client counseling, fact investigation, case planning, legal research, legal analysis and writing, oral and written advocacy, and critical self-reflection.  Each case will be broken into its smallest components and the students will be expected to pursue and consider as many legal, factual, ethical, and strategic issues as time permits and the cases requires.

To enroll in the Immigration Clinic, students must have completed three semesters and thirty-six credit hours.  Prerequisites for this course are Immigration Law and Professional Responsibility.  Other relevant courses that students may wish to consider prior to participation in this Clinic include Trial Advocacy, Client Counseling, Evidence, Advanced Legal Writing, and Administrative Law.  Issues related to criminal law, family law, juvenile law, disabilities law, tax law, and public benefits law might also occasionally arise in the course of the Clinic’s work.

The Immigration Clinic is six credit hours.  The students will be required to commit to a minimum of approximately 20 hours per week.  (The time necessary will vary over the course of the semester depending on the stage of the student’s cases.)  These hours include the time spent in classroom attendance, meeting with faculty, class and case preparation, and case related meetings and appearances.  Students will spend three hours per week in class and at least an hour per week in individual or small group case team meetings with their faculty supervisor.  The remaining hours each week will be spent in activities including class preparation, client meetings, and other casework. In addition to these weekly hours during the semester, students who enroll will be required to attend a pre-semester orientation to be held in the week prior to the start of classes.  This orientation will provide an intensive review of some of the substantive and procedural law to be used in the clinic course, review some of the special client issues presented by these cases, and lead students in some simulated exercises relevant to the cases. 

Students who have questions about the Immigration Clinic are welcome to contact Professor Kate Aschenbrenner at 407-681-5403 or at kaschenbrenner@barry.edu.

Oh oh ....

We are sorry but it appears that JavaScript is disabled on your browser.
Our site is very interactive and it requires JavaScript to be enabled.
Click on the link below for instructions on how to enable JavaScript on your browser.

Enable JavaScript on your browser