Nursing Students Study Abroad Blog


N-SAP Jamaica

3/14/2013

What an extraordinary and gratifying experience! Ten days ago, I embraced a task without really knowing what to expect or without really knowing anyone of the group that I later became part. In the weeks prior to the trip, we started learning a few things about the Jamaican culture, our main objectives, and we started preparing everything we needed to accomplish our goals. The group started to get to know each others and we began to build rapport, and what will later became a very strong friendship. Once we arrived in Jamaica, we started to assimilate the culture, the food the music, the people, and our plans started to shape into the most amazing experience we have ever had. In Jamaica, we had to start "playing things by air", he had to make "executive decisions" and "democratic" ones, and in the most wonderful way out of many, we became one. Our group made history, we stablished a relationship we the Northern Caribbean University, and with the ministry of health. We went out to the community, we had a health fair where 210 clients from the community were screened, and we sat with public health nurses, and the Honorary Minister of Health to share our experiences and modest suggestions. In these ten days I became part of these group of people determined to give the best of ourselves with one task in mind, become culturally competent nurses with the ability to recognize the differences and similarities of our cultures and to share them with the rest of our colleagues back home. We had to adapt, we were able to apply the nursing process at its maximum. We assessed communities, determine its needs, plan accordingly and intervene as our possibilities allowed us. Our evaluations were heard and our solutions encouraged to be used. Personally, I have grown so much from this experience, I feel comfortable to take care of my patients from any different background, I will always consider the cultural differences, and with the outmost respect, personalize the care of my patients according to their needs, which include medical, spiritual and cultural, I have become a culturally competent nurse. I have to say that I am proud to have been part of this study abroad program that united a multicultural group of eight students with their own cultural differences. Among ourselves, we had people from United States, Puerto Rico, Haiti, Nicaragua, Cuba, and our own Jamaicans that took the responsibility to guide us and share their culture and knowledge and glued us together as one extraordinaire melting pot, we experienced first hand what Bob Marley referred as "One Love", and out of many we became one.
Loreta Gonzalez

This is the End

3/14/2013

Today at 0825 am with the arrival at Fort Lauderdale Airport, our journey came to an end. It has been one of the most intense eleven days in my life. I do not think I will be able to express in words how eye opening and transforming this study abroad has impacted and will impact my professional career as nurse and my personal life. I had made strong relationships with the same classmates I’ve been seeing for almost two years in the hallways at school and did not even know their names. Our two professors, Dr. Delpeech and Dr. McGregor, were two essentials and valuable key to us as students during this journey. Their compassion and willingness to teach us and expose us to many different community and cultural experiences made them a big space in our hearts. These relationships will stay forever.

I found that studying abroad during college contributes greatly to making your overall experiences as a college student complete. Before I embarked in this trip I was not sure if I should do it because I was the only one from my class thinking about it and everyone else were seniors and knew each other from class. Now I can say, I am so glad I went ahead and conquer my fears of not fitting in and enjoy every little moment of this amazing trip. I am looking forward once I graduate from nursing school being part of organizations that go around the world on different missions at least once a year. Before I loved the profession of nursing and the many different paths it could take me, now I cannot see myself doing anything else but nursing. The impact of the work we do is just essential. Thank you to all the people who made this journey possible for us. You have truly changed our lives. Thank you!


"This is the End"

3/14/2013

By: DAYANA MACHADO

Last Day

3/14/2013

Today was a sad day. It was the day we had to head back home to Miami. We packed our bags the night before and tried to enjoy as much of Jamaica that we could possibly enjoy before leaving for the airport at 3am. Man was I tired when I woke up at 3am to head to the airport to catch our 6am flight to Fort Lauderdale. So we all gathered at the front entrance of the hotel where we said our goodbyes to the wonderful staff and left behind s signed Barry University T-shirt. On our way to the airport we drove to the sound of Jamaican music where we danced and sung our hearts out. As the lights of the city disappeared to give way to the views of the airport I looked back at all we had done in Jamaica and realized that I wouldnt have changed anything about this experience. And I would not change the members of the N-SAP team, we grew during our trip to Jamaica and formed new bonds.

While at the airport I decided to buy my last piece of Jamaice before I leave- Jamaican patties (which do NOT taste like the ones here in south florida by the way)!!!

It was during checking in at the airport that I realized that I am going to leave the land of "no problem", where people are happy and not pressed for time. It dawned on me that I enjoyed not being pressed for time. When your in Jamaica it's almost as if you have time to do EVERYTHING as opposed to living in the US where there isnt enough time for all the things that we have to do in a day. In the land of many one people, I can understand why Jamaicans love there country.

One Love, One Heart.

 

Jahneen Buckley.


A Better Tomorrow....."Yeah Mon"

3/14/2013

Our journey together on the 2013 N-SAP trip to Jamaica has come to the end. It seems like yesterday we all met for the first time together with our professors to discuss the trip about two months ago. Like many other students, I did not know what to expect once we would arrive in Jamaica. I know for sure that the reason I join the group was to receive a different view of nursing from the eyes and ears of another culture. Also, I believed that I would obtain knowledge that would later help me in becoming a better nurse and also assist the health personal in Jamaica and maybe make a difference in the way they deliver health care. With great honor, I am here reporting that these thoughts of mine prior to the trip have indeed become a reality. While in Jamaica, we worked in their locals clinics and learned how to maximize productivity with what little resources they had. This is truly a valuable skill that I will implement into every situation that my nursing career takes me on.

 

As for my fellow N-SAP classmates and professors, I can’t say enough about how great we bonded together. Many of us either did not have much interaction with each other or had not even spoken to one another prior to the trip. But I can definitely tell you that, after spending almost two weeks together, we have all formed bonds that may truly last a life-time. This is especially true about our professors which deserve all the praise in the world for such a wonderful job that they did. To Dr. Delpech and Dr. McGregor I want to thank them from the bottom of my heart for making such a wonderful trip possible by teaching us both about nursing and about life throughout the entire trip. Even in our schedules down-times and few off days, our professor always found a way to plug in important teachings that will take us through the rest of our lives.

 

In conclusion, this adventure has positively changed my life forever. I ask for future students to strongly consider participating in any N-SAP program that becomes available. The relationships that we made in Jamaica with, top health personals, will open relations for many years to come. This in my opinion, is the purpose of these trips. We bring the entire world together one trip at a time, and in the end we hope we make this planet and better place to live.

 

Henry Cabrera


Fond memories

3/14/2013

 Here I sit, home, in Miami reminiscing on the times and people that I have come to love over the past 10 days. After a short flight from paradise, we arrived home exhausted. Though I was ready to come back, I was sad to leave the amazing island behind.
  I feel truly blessed to have been given the opportunity to travel to Jamaica with a group of nursing students that, even though we had spent 2 years together, never got the opportunity to know each other. You can literally see the difference in our connection from the first day, when we barely knew what to say to each other, until now when we can finish each other's sentences. I have seen the good, the bad, and the hilarious of our group- including our instructors. Between Julia braiding our hair, sharing soup with Dr. Delpech, and singing along to reggae with everyone in the van, I feel like we couldn't have had a better group to experience the craziness of Jamaica with. 
 I will never forget the treacherous climb of Dunn's River Falls, the fish at Gloria's, the meeting with the Minister of Health, and the trips with Lincoln to experience Jamaica's real culture. The clinics will remain in the back of my mind throughout my nursing career, reminding me to remain open in my views and resourceful in my care. I will know better than to expect every patient to have the money to buy their own equipment and medicine and I will look for alternate solutions to encouraging their control of their own health. I will never again take advantage of  IV pumps or disposable needles ever again. I will stop complaining about a new nurse's salary and the amount of work we have to do. I have learned the importance of educating our patients- something that I always took for granted. Ignoring education can result in, not only patient's understanding of their disease but also, their ability to care for themselves. Therefore, this ignorance leads to increased seeking of care, increased costs, and an increased strain on the health care system. The knowledge of this will greatly empower all of us with the upcoming changes in the Affordable Care Act.
 Professor Delpech, Professor McGreggor, you are both inspiring, intelligent, and adventurous women. I cannot thank you enough for giving us a chance to experience nursing from a perspective we would otherwise be void of. You both make me feel so confident about being a nurse and what possibilities are available to me once I become a professional. I hope that one day I am able to show a group of students that being a professional doesn't mean you can't have a fun time. And that adventuring to new worlds can further your education in ways you cant imagine. 
 Henry, thank you for bringing a smile (and a picture) to our faces everywhere we went. Dayana, thank you for being so ridiculous all the time, without you we would've had to cut our laughs down by half. Mara, thanks for sharing my looks of exasperation, if not for you I would think I was too cynical. Kelissa, thanks for discussing the ups and downs of conservatism with me, introspection is often the greatest gift. Julia, thanks for treating me like a Barbie doll, it felt like middle school all over again. Loreta, thanks for being the best roommate I could've asked for- who knew that OCD and el ron could bring us together the way it did. And Jamaican Jahneen, I think I'll miss you most of all. 

All my love,
   Whitney 

"The End"

3/14/2013

Today marks the end of our journey.  It began about two months ago with a group of eight students whom we have all seen at one time or another in class or in the halls for the past year.  We all knew of each other but never really got to know one another on a personal level.  This all changed once we began preparing for the trip that would forever change our lives.  During our weekly meetings Dr. Delpech and Dr. McGregor would give us assignments to prepare us for the trip. They would teach us about the Jamaican culture, how to become more culturally competent, the differences and similarities between the Jamaican health care system and the US, and many other topics.  We also had to prepare for a health fair which we were doing on the campus of Northern Caribbean University.

At first, I like many others had many reservations as to if I really wanted to go.  I was not sure if I wanted to leave my home life, husband, and children for 11 days.  In the end I am happy that I decided to go because this experience has changed my life in many ways.  I was exposed and immersed in a culture which was completely foreign to me.  I enjoyed the beautiful scenery, music, the friendly people, and even started tolerating the spicy foods.  I became more culturally competent because I was able to socialize and interact with the local people.  I learned the local names they give to diarrhea "running belly" and fontanels "moles".  I allowed myself to become engulfed with everything Jamaica had to offer and in the end I feel I was able to understand their culture and health beliefs.  Secondly, the friendships and bonds I developed with the students and faculty will last a lifetime.  The memories we have made are many and they will always be cherished in my heart.  Lastly this experience has given me personal and intellectual growth which can only be gained by studying abroad.  

I would like to personally thank Dr. Delpech and Dr. McGregor for giving me the opportunity of being part of this wonderful experience.  If it wasn't for their hard work and dedication this trip would not have been possible. 

Mara.

 

 


Day 11

3/13/2013

This morning we each had the unfortunate pleasure to get up at 5 am and travel two hours to get to Mandeville and endure an entire day of lectures and presentations. Northern Caribbean University called it a Research Symposium. Personally for an awesome name like that I expected better outcomes than what they gave us. First of all when we reached there were hardly any students in the audience, mostly staff and faculty. The program started late and they sung songs and had prayers, which were both lovely and refreshing.  Before each presenter there was an introduction for that person and unfortunately the keynote speaker never made it and the faulty spent precious time waiting on her arrival. Normally back home we would have gave a reason for her absence and kept it moving but the dean of nursing thought otherwise and gave her presentation. We thought it was a little odd that she would do that, but she did it nonetheless. One thing I noticed as the morning progressed was that each and every single presenter had read straight from the PowerPoint. Everything that we, as nursing students at Barry, were taught NOT to do they did. They had way too much information on the PowerPoint’s and read word for word what they had on EVERY single slide. The funny thing is that it was the dean of nursing and the educators that mostly did this. I could not imagine having them as my professors because the monotones of their voices were putting all of us to sleep. But don’t get me wrong; the content was important because they discussed the past, present and future of nursing among other topics. The best part of the morning was when Dr. McGregor went up to give her presentation. She woke everyone up with her statistical data about the shortage of nurses in America and the amount of nursing schools that opened up recently in the last 5 years. She never read from the PowerPoint and gave great and thorough information. When Dr. Delpech went up and gave her presentation, she stole the show. She was so animated and enthusiastic. She discussed teaching and different ways to engage students and different grading methods. The entire student population was clapping at that point and she had to ask them for silence to continue.  All in all our professors, in my opinion, put the others to shame merely because they seemed more enthusiastic and grabbed the audience attention way more than any prior person up there. After lunch we got the opportunity to present after the first year nursing students presented on the nursing theorists. My group presented on Dengue Fever and we performed quite excellent. We each knew what we were talking about and were very efficient in getting our point across.  One thing that amazed me was the fact that when I showed pictures of ways to prevent mosquitos from swarming around the house I gave examples based on what I saw. One thing that shocked every single person in the audience was a picture of a pink baby tub that a mother had placed on top of a sink filled with dirty dishes that was outside. I explained how we, Dr. McGregor, my classmates, the nurse and public aide and I observed this young mother bathe her newborn daughter in the tub filled with freezing cold water and left the tub right there and didn’t empty out the water nor remove the tub. The gastroenteritis group did an amazing job as well and gave a lot of examples as well. They had various pictures just as we had.  After they went it was finally time to leave and we were SO excited. They presented the professors with gorgeous bags and gave each of us a pen and a bolt keychain. We could not wait to leave and was so happy to be on the road. We topped off a long and tiring day with an amazing Jamaican Italian dinner and then went back to the hotel where we went to rest and get ready to come home that next morning.

Julia L. Cunningham 


Jamaica: Day 11- NCU Research Symposium

3/13/2013

Today was like the longest day in history! Mandeville is about two hours away from Kingston so in order to travel to the Research Symposium being held at NCU were leaving our hotel by 6:15am! When we arrived a few minutes after 8 we took our seats and waited for the day to begin. Some distinguished guest were running late so we did not start until after 9. The day was split into three sessions with breaks in between. We stayed up late and woke up early so I must admit it was a little difficult to stay awake during some presentations that went rather long. After the first session we had a snack break and then it was back in for another round. It was a little easier to pay attention since our professors were two of the three presenters for this session. I know you'll think I'm being honest, but they were the best presenters of the day. Ask anyone?! They represented Barry well! Go Dr. Delpech and Dr. McGregor! After this we had a break for lunch and after lunch the NCU student presented on several nursing theorists. Then it was finally our turn. Half of our group presented on Gastroenteritis and the other half on Dengue Fever which is endemic to Jamaica. After closing words we were finally ready to depart and boy were we ready. We were exhausted! We were actualy ended at 5pm! 
By the time we got back to Kingston it 7 almost 8pm! So we decided we would have our last meal in Jamaica together before we headed back to the hotel. We went to an Italian spot called Da Vinci's. The food was awesome and we share memories and laughed all night. Finally it was back to the hotel. We decided it was pointless to got to sleep (sleep who needs it right?) since we had to leave the hotel around 3 am! to make it to the airport on time. Stay up all night with the guys was one of my fondest memories of this trip. We shared our philosophical and political views in one of the most intellectually engaging conversations, outside of a classroom I've had in quite a while. I won't soon forget it. I will miss my group, I will miss the beautiful mountains and the amazing beaches, and all the fun we had hanging together. But I am ready to go home! Miami here I come! 

Its been fun. Thanks for following our journey on this blog!

Kelissa G.

Research Symposium

3/13/2013

Today was the long awaited day! All N-SAP members including Dr. Delpech and Dr. Mcgreggor all in one room the night before the symposium practiced our presentations over and over the night before and provided each other with feedback.

We all dragged ourselves out of bed at before 6am to get ready to leave the hotel at 6am to head to Mandeville. On our way to Mandeville we took in the amazing scenery Jamaica has to offer and also stopped at a rest stop along the highway to eat breakfast. I had to have coffee to keep me awake and I tried to cornmeal porridge that Jamaicans like to eat for breakfast and man was it delicious!! So off we went in our bus, on our way to NCU. We arrived and was directed to the lecture hall where the symposium was held. We were then treated by a traditional performance by an NCU student, and then stood for Jamaica's national anthem. After that we listened to a number of speakers, but nothing made me more proud than when our very own Dr. Mcgreggor and Dr. Delpech delivered amazing presentations! I beamed with pride when I saw how engaged the audience was in what they were presenting and how the audience was eager to ask questions related to their presentation.

Then the moment that all Barry students present waitied for- OUR presentation of our communicable project to the people of Jamaica. We did our school proud and held our audience's attention and got them involved in our presentation. Well done guys! We did such an amazing job using a specific disease to compare the Jamaican healthcare system and the healthcare system in the US.

 

After that NCU staff gave us a small token of appreciation for presenting at their research symposium and expressed that they would like to keep the Barry/NCU relationship going. After much long talks and goodbyes we left Mandeville and headed to the supermarker in Kingston to buy anything else we might have needed before we left the island. Some of us slept on our way back into Kingston because of all the hard work that we had done. We dined a DaVinci's Cafe in Kingston and all took the time to tell each other how much we appreciated being a member of the N-SAP team and how much we enjoyed coming to Jamaica.

 

 

 

Jahneen Buckley


Research symposium

3/13/2013

Today we went back to NCU campus in Mandeville for the research symposium. There were many presentations on current issues of nursing and their perspectives here in Jamaica, and some of the reforms necessary in healthcare. I have to admit that although the topics were really interesting, the presenters lack the rapport we are used to in our conferences, they were very monotonous and authoritarian. At the beginning of the symposium they sang various songs and the national anthem. I would have to say there were a lot of formalities at the beginning and at the end, that took time form the actual symposium, therefore some of the presentations had to be rushed. On the other hand we were very well welcomed, and our presentations were well received and taken in consideration. It was a very friendly atmosphere, and a relationship between both universities was stablished and sealed today. I am very proud to have been part of this group and have share this experience.
Loreta Gonzalez

Research Symposium

3/13/2013

 Today was the long- awaited research symposium at NCU. We woke up bright and early at 5am and took the long 2 hours drive to Mandeville. When we arrived at 815, the symposium, that was scheduled for 8am had still not begun. But, after being on Jamaican time for the last 10 days, we expected as much.
 At 845 things started to wind up, and the greetings began. What we were NOT expecting is that they would not end until 45 minutes later. We were given introductory and welcome speeches by about 6 staff members, then we prayed, sang, and watched a sung performance of some Jamaican literature. It was all very interesting and heart-warming but knowing how long the day would be, we were happy when the first speaker finally went on. 
 One speaker discussed the history of Jamaican nursing and how it affects our present and future. While she was a well-respected member of the nursing community, I found her presentation a little dry and long winded. But I am told that is the custom here. After another speaker talked about Midwifery in the Caribbean, we broke for lunch. Being a 7th day Adventist school, they served only fish and vegetables. 
 After lunch is when the fun really began. Dr. McGreggor and  Dr. Delpech gave their presentations and let me tell you- they showed those professors how it is really done. Both of them captivated the audience, not just us as their students, but the NCU students and faculty as well. Dr. Delpech literally had several ovations in the midst of her presentation. Basically, we learned the do's and dont's of public speaking and symposiums in general. The organization, time management, and choice of presenters is more important than we had cared to realize in the past but I am proud to say that our good doctors left an excellent impression of Barry University that NCU will not soon forget. 
 Then the NCU freshmen presented their nursing theorists and we went on to present about dengue fever and gastroenteritis. Though we were nervous about presenting in front of strangers, I believe that we all gave a great performance and left the audience with the idea that we are intelligent, well prepared nurses who are proud of our profession and ready to promote it. 
 It was a good day and I am sad to say, our last in Jamaica. I have had such an amazing time here I will be sad to head back to the real world. But more on that tomorrow... 

 Whitney Hawkins

Meeting the Minister of Health

3/12/2013

Today we woke up to enjoy a nice breakfast. All N-SAP members decided to wear our N-SAP tshirts to meet the Minister of Health in Jamaica today. So we set off to downtown kingston where we all filed into the Ministry of Health lobby waiting to be escorted to the Minister's conference room. On our way to the conference room I thought about what an experience this would be and how it would change my life.We all sat down in the conference room wondering what's the appropriate way to address the minister. Finally the Minister's secretary came in and took our requests for refreshments, and then we met the Chief Nursing Officer of Jamaica and the Deputy Chief Nursing Officer of Jamaica. A few minutes later the Minister of Health walked in and greeted us. Listening to the Mmnister talk and listen to our concerns made me feel honored to be a part of Barry's N-SAP team. The minister and his team were receptive to our suggestions and also told of us future plans for the healthcare system of Jamaica. After much conversation we took photographs with the minister and his staff..

After that we visited the local craft market where we bought some of the local products. We then went to the grocery store where we bought items that we wanted to take back home to Miami with us. On our way home I just so happened to see this lady who was selling mangoes in the middle of the street. I decided to buy some and they were so delicious!

 

 

 

 

Jahneen Buckley


The Honorary Minister of Health

3/12/2013

One of the most important days of our trip. The day that we sat down with the Honorary Minister of Health and the Chief Nurse to seal a relationship that will hopefully be long lasting. It was a very exiting moment, and a very important one. The minister and chief nurse were amazingly open to our experiences and suggestions and even encouraged us to give solutions for what we thought needed improvement. One of our objectives for this trip was to establish a relationship between both countries, and we absolutely did that. At first we did not really understand how to present or talk to the cabinet, as there is a royalty atmosphere around the ministry, but it was actually a very relaxed conversation that turned out to be an incredible experience. After the meeting we just enjoyed a day of tourism and souvenirs.   

Day 10

3/12/2013

Today Barry University and their senior nursing students made history. We had the opportunity to sit in the  office of the minister of health of Jamaica and the chief nurse officer as well. The minister gave each of us the chance to describe and share our experiences here in Jamaica, and even noted some of our suggestions to the current public health care system. We established the differences between both systems in America and Jamaica and discussed the possibilities of a future and ongoing relationship for our program.  After an hour session of questions and discussion we concluded with a lot of pictures and handshakes. When we left the ministry of health we went shopping at the craft market downtown to soak up some of the Jamaican culture with us. It has been such an interesting day and can not wait to be mentioned in the history books as important mediators in bringing Jamaica more closer to America. 

Julia L. Cunningham


Jamaica: Day 10- Meeting the Minister of Health

3/12/2013

Today we had the incredible privilege of meeting with the Minister of Health for the entire country of Jamaica. He is a high ranking government official for Jamaica and is a part of the Parliament. Also attending the meeting was the Chief Nursing Officer of Jamaica. We were able to sit a table with them and speak freely about our experiences in the Jamaican public healthcare system for the last couple of days. I was impressed by how willing they were to hear our input though we are students. Also they were willing to answer any questions that we asked. We were honest. We did tell them about the things that concerned us namely the ineffective patient teaching that we saw, the lack of evaluation of teaching methods, and the overloaded public clinics as a result of patients seeking services for trivial procedures that can be done at home if they are taught.
Though we made our recommendations, I'm not sure if they were taken seriously. Nevertheless, we were thrilled with the opportunity. After the meeting we headed to the local Craft Market. Here vendors sell handmade crafts, bags, sandals, and other souvenirs. It looked just like the flea markets that we have here. After stopping at the Cambio (a place that exchanges US money into Jamaican money) we grabbed a bite at a Jerk restaurant called Sweetwood. Then we finally returned to the hotel for some rest and to get ready for our last day in Jamrock.
Later that night we all met up in one of our hotel rooms and gave our presentation to each other in order to practice for the Research Symposium we are attending tomorrow. It was clear how close we had become as a group as we sat and laid anywhere we could find room as we practiced our presentations. Our professors also presented for us and we gave each other tips on how to make them better. Let's see how they go!

Kelissa G.

Day 9

3/11/2013

Today we went to Northern Caribbean University for the health fair. It was an amazing experience as we saw about 210 clients. My focus was on client education and we discuss different topics, from how to control hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes. We spread handouts, distributed oral hygiene items, and attended different conferences.  The health fair had different stations, we started with height, weight and BMI calculations, then blood pressure measurements, and we also had a glucose check table and a blood typing screening. After clients went thru all the stations and their values were plotted in a card, they came to my station and then I focused education according to their needs. Overall it was an incredible experience, as we helped the community and also personnel from the faculty. I have a sense of accomplishment, as I was able to implement the nursing process to a maximum.

Julia L. Cunningham


Health Fair Day

3/11/2013

Today we went to the Northern Caribbean University for the health fair that we had prepared to help the community and to interact with Jamaican nursing students. The fair was success, we screened about 210 clients including community clients and university personnel. The screenings included weight, height, BMI, blood pressure, glucose, and as an initiative from the university they also included blood type screening. Conferences about dental hygiene, hydro massage, and common screenings required for disease prevention were also included in the program. It was a very welcoming environment, everyone was very enthusiast about what was being done. After the hard work was concluded, we had a tour of the university's facilities, and we conclude our visit. I really enjoyed the atmosphere and I feel very accomplished for everything we have done in this trip.
Loreta Gonzalez

Health fair day

3/11/2013

 Today was an amazing turn out at our health fair in Mandeville. We're used to having health fairs in Miami where people come for BP readings and blood sugars that they already know and advice that falls on deaf ears. Here, many of these people have never been to a doctor or clinic because of their remote location. They were extremely excited about the opportunity to get checked for free and even more concerned about their results- which they had never seen before. I can't tell you how many people asked me how to reduce blood sugars that were 113. Let me know if you've ever heard anyone in Miami say that.
 I guess what made me realize it was the fact that we're so used to seeing hypertension in The States that when I saw a BP of 140/90 in told someone it was fine. Then I had to catch myself and realize that this was a preventative screening and it was my job to give a these people the advice they needed, and actually wanted, to prevent hypertension. They gave me all types of information about their diet and were eager to hear my advice. In comparison to every other health fair I've been to where people just nod when I tell them their BP is 200/97 and tell me they haven't taken their medicine. The people here would kill to have access to those same medicines. 
 I guess what I'm saying is this is the first health fair I've done since starting nursing school where I think I actually helped some people. Today was a good day.

- Whitney 

Mandeville Health Fair

3/11/2013

Today we held the health fair in Mandeville, Jamaica at the Northern Caribbean University’s (NSU) main campus. The exact location of the health fair was directly outside of their nursing building which overlooks an incredibly beautiful area of high-end homes on many different levels of hills and huge mountains in the background. The theme for the health fair was “Knowing Your numbers…Taking Charge Of Your Health.” Everyone that attended the fair was given a registration card that they would take to each one of the booths that included: blood pressure reading, blood glucose level, height/weight and subsequently body mass index, and the students from NSU assisted us in each station and also had their own blood type screening station. The last station was created to provide health education once the participants “knew their numbers” and decided to sit down for a few minutes with us students and discuss what changes, if any, needed to occur. At first I started at the blood glucose screening but by the end of the health fair we had all moved throughout the stations.

 

One of the most interesting aspects of the health fair was working alongside the faculty and students from NCU who welcomed us with open arms and treated us with the utmost respect. I loved talking to the students about the material that they’re covering in their classes and discussing their graduations. This was when I realized how universal nursing really is because most of the material that they are either receiving now or received in the past, we students from Barry University have also covered. Being on how male nurses are so few in numbers, especially here in Jamaica, I was excited to hold a conversation with Mr. Bennett. Mr. Bennett is a nursing instructor at NCU who spoke to me about critical nursing since I explained that it’s what I would like to practice.

 

The health fair was truly a success with about 210 individuals from the community having gone through all the stations. We found many opportunities for patient teaching as it related to hypertension, hyperglycemia, and overall healthy diet and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. We ended our trip to Mandeville with a tour of the campus and a few pictures with the students.    

 

 

 


Mandeville Health Fair

3/11/2013

"Mandeville Health Fair" entry by Henry Cabrera

Jamaica: Day 9- NCU Health Fair

3/11/2013

I had the most amazing time at the Health Fair that we hosted today on the main campus of Northern Caribbean University in Mandeville, Jamaica. Health fair participants got their height, weight, body mass index, blood pressure and blood glucose checked. I was stationed at the education booth where I had the opportunity to teach patients briefly about what the results of the screenings meant and give them relevant health education materials. I had so much fun doing that because I got to talk to the people one on one. I made such an impression on one client that he came back just to give me a bag full of exotic fruit just because I mentioned in passing that I love mangoes! 
While we were in the clinic setting last week our role was passive since all we were able to do was observe. But today, I felt I really made a difference. I encourage all the people that I saw to eat a healthier diet, exercise regular, limit foods high in salt, sugar and fat and so on. And you know what, I felt that I was really being listened to. Many of the Northern Caribbean University students also came out to the health fair...in droves! So in order to cut down the line that was forming, I did group teaching with them since they were already familiar with a lot of the things that I had to say. They were so much fun, I wish we had the opportunity to hang out with the nursing students more. They huddled around me in a semi circle and we did a quick review of BMI, hypertension and diabetes and the appropriate management. In those brief moments with them I felt that I had already established quite a rapport with them. I wished them luck and sent them off with smiles and hugs.
After the health fair we had lunch on the campus and then some nursing students took us for a tour of the campus. The campus is beautiful but quite hilly!!! We got a good work out just walking around! The nursing building at NCU is gorgeous! It's brand new only about 5 or 6 years old and I must say I was quite envious of their labs and simulations rooms! They were amazing! The NCU nursing program is the top in Jamaica and their school boasts the island's highest passing rates.
After that full day we had to head back to Kingston on a long, bumpy, two hour ride! Needless to say I was dozing off in the car on the way home! Sadly we have only two day left here in Jamaica. I look forward to seeing what these days hold for us.

Kelissa G.


Health Fair at Mandaville

3/11/2013

Today we finally did the health fair. It was a day full of teaching, screening, and meeting other nursing students. We arrive at NCU (Northern Caribbean University) around 0830, and there were people already waiting on us. The staff from the university were very kind in setting up the different tables we were going to use. We had one registration table, one BMI/Ht/Wt, two blood pressure tables, one blood glucose test, and one education/teaching table. Between 0900 and 1300 we saw 210 people; we felt so proud of ourselves. It had an amazing turned out, and people were very interested in getting "their numbers" and then go to the education table to seek more information about how to preserve their health. After 1300 we had lunch with the nursing students who helped us at the health fair and they also gave us a tour throughout campus. Personally, I felt we made an impact on the health of those people who took their time to come to our fair and get screened and listened to the education portion. The staff from the university were very satisfied with our job and even several people asked us when we were coming back! It has been definitely a very productive day!

"Know Your Numbers" Health Fair Day

3/11/2013

Today we had to be ready and in the van by 6:30am.  We had a long bumpy journey to the Northern Carribbean University (NCU) where we had to prepare and do our health fair.  When we arrived there were a couple of people from the local community waiting for us patiently.  Prior to commencing the fair the staff and the nursing students welcomed us with open arms and bright faces.  Many of them expressed their gratitude for being there and joining them at the health fair. 

The health fair was a huge success we screened about 210 people.  Many of them were from the local community, students of NCU, and staff members.  The health fair had many different stations the Barry and NCU students were doing height, weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, and an education station.  I personally worked at the registration station, the blood pressure station, and education station.  I really enjoyed teaching and explaining to the locals what some of the numbers meant and what they needed to do to such as lifestyle modification in eating and exercise to improve their health.  In addition the medical students from NCU had other stations such as blood typing, vision screening, therapeutic massage, and healthy eating demonstrations and tips.  The fruitbread muffin they made were warm and delicious.  Too bad there isn't any breadfruit in Miami I would have loved to make that recipe at home.

I feel that we had a very successful day.  I enjoyed the interaction we had with the nursing students.  I would have liked to have had more time with the students to share more stories and learn more from them.

Mara.


"Health Fair at Mandaville"

3/11/2013

By: Dayana Machado

Health Fair

3/11/2013

We left at 6am to make the 2 hour drive to Mandeville. We left without breakfast, sleepy and cranky because we lacked sleep. Today we participated in a Health Fair at Northern Caribbean University (NCU) and we saw over 200 people! It was an amazing experience. I enjoyed getting to know the natives of Mandeville and helping to answer the health related questions they asked me. I was assigned to the Education table but I felt like my place was at the blood pressure table, and sure enough there was where I was meant to be. I met an individual with an extremely high blood pressure, and I hope what I instructed him to do helped him to prevent hypertension related problems. I felt like I made a difference in the people of Mandeville. We also got to work with some of the senior nursing students which gave us an opportunity to have a conversation that involved the Barry students asking about NCU’s curriculum and the NCU students asking us about our nursing program. After the health fair was over we had lunch with some of the NCU faculty and nursing students. I got the opportunity to ask a NCU instructor about his teaching method and how similar nursing students are. This NCU faculty member was more than happy to share his expertise and teaching style with us and how he interacts with his students.

On our ride back I had time to think about all that we have done here in Jamaica, and while we didnt get to help the entire population, I feel that we made a difference by starting out small.


Day 8

3/10/2013

Today was a day that we spent relaxing and studying. We caught up with our studies and our projects. We presented our infectious disease powerpoint presentations and they helped us revise them and recommended changes. Overall we got an opportunity to catch up on the work.


Julia L. Cunningham

Relax Day

3/10/2013

Today was a relax day. We took this time to work on our communicable disease project. It wasn’t easy trying to get our project together and be able to study at the same time, but somehow we got through it. I decided that we didn’t want the hotel food because it’s expensive so we had food from Tastee’s Patty. After that we walk around the neighborhood of the hotel and walked to Emancipation Park where we stared at the monument at the entrance of the park in awe. We had to ask a local for directions to get to Emancipation Park, but eventually we made it there.

I was hoping that we would return to Devon's House for some yummy ice cream too, but we forgot about it.


Relax/study Day

3/10/2013

Today we finally got to sleep until late. There were no activities planned for the day, therefore we took the opportunity to sleep in and do our projects, prepare for the health fair tomorrow, and get some study done for our upcoming exams. My group got together and we finally finish our 2 projects, primary prevention and dengue fever, which we are going to be presenting at the Research Symposium on Wednesday. It was a beautiful day with the perfect temperature. Some of our classmates got the opportunity to get some tanning. Tomorrow is going to be an early day since we are leaving at 0630 to Mandaville to have our health fair. We will let you how it went!

Dayana M. 

Soaking Up the Sun

3/10/2013

Today was a very relaxing day where we all got to do whatever we wanted to.  Many of us slept late and almost missed the "FREE" breakfast that was being served until 10:30am.  Afterwards we all lounged around the pool.  I was studying for my Med-Surge final, other studied for their peds final, and the remaining few worked on the prevention project for our community class.  I was so focused on studying and tanning that I soaked up too much sun.  My tan became a red burn.  Not good! 

One interesting thing I learned today was that many stores do not open on Sunday.  One would think that this is the day where many locals are off of work and they can go out and catch up on groceries, shopping, or just going out to eat.  However, this is not the norm here Sunday is considered a day of rest.  This was a bit disappointing because we all needed to go on a food run at the supermarket to pick up snacks. 

Mara


Jamaica: Day 7 - Dunns River Falls

3/9/2013

         Today we took a bumpy 2 hour ride to Ocho Rios, Jamaica. When we finally got there, it felt like I was in a dream or in a movie. The beauty was breathtaking. We went to Dunns River Falls which is a gorgeous water fall that flows into the ocean. I did the most adventurous thing I've ever done. I climbed waterfalls! Barefoot and all! It was so scary and yet so fun! I'm so glad I didn't chicken out! It was unbelievably beautiful and while climbing up this waterfall, it was so strange but I felt I was discovering a part of myself I didn't know existed. As I looked at my feet stepping one slippery rock after the other, this city girl felt almost at home. As if I was doing what I was born to do. It's weird. It only made my interest in visiting my homeland Haiti, grow even more! I guess there are certain parts of yourself that just can't be denied.
        After the falls, I went down to the beach where we Jet skied and saw Dolphins at the near by Dolphin cove. I ended the day with dinner at Margaritaville. The view was picturesque and the fish and chips I had was delicious. We hit the road after that for a long, dark drive back to Kingston where people ignored signs that read Undertakers love careless overtakers as many cars passed us on the narrow dark roads. We made it back to Kingston safely, Thank God! And we were all too tired to do anything else so after a warm shower we were all done for the evening. 


Kelissa G.

day 6

3/9/2013

Today was the last day in the clinics and luckily when we arrived at Windward Road Clinic the charge nurse told us that she, herself, was going on home visits. I was so excited. We left and went with Professor McGregor, the nurse, a public health aide and went to three different houses. Each visit was to do a post partum check up, give immunizations, and give a general check up of the newborns and babies we saw. There were a few mothers that had not had any prenatal care, did not show up for their clinic dates and were behind on immunizations. One mother seemed, in my opinion, to be suffering from post partum depression because she did not have any emotions on her face, she seemed to be uninterested in learning about how to breastfeed her baby, she lacked eye contact, and more. The second mother had all her children and newborn in a small room while she smoked. The smell was very strong and could be sensed from the entrance. She was advised to stop smoking or at least cease the smoking around her young children and newborn baby. She also lacked prenatal care and was non compliant with her follow up visits for herself and the baby. We really tried our hardest to advise the young mother and teach her about the harmful effects of smoking for her and her children, also about the importance of follow up appointments for herself and her kids. The last mother had 3 children in home with her, they were VERY adorable, with sweet innocent smiles that only children have. After her check up we left and returned back to the clinic. As a group we took pictures with the workers that took the time to get to know us and showed us love and respect. Afterwards we went to Maxfield Park and had our evaluations, gave suggestions and went to Tastees for lunch.  We had some super AWESOME chicken, fries, and coco fries.


 Julia L. Cunningham


Day 7

3/9/2013

Today we went to Dunn’s River Falls in Ocho Rios. It was an extremely long ride because we took the scenic route. It was a lot of exercise. The river, naturally, has fresh water and it empties into the ocean. It was very mountainous and the beautiful sea. It was an exiting and fun day. We had to suffer and endure these EXTREMELY steep stairs to the sea. After that had lunch at Margarita Ville. Let me say that the food was gross, the pool was green and it was UNREASONABLY expensive for no reason.

 

 

Julia L Cunningham  


Day in Ochi Rios

3/9/2013

Today was a cultural immersion day! We left the hotel at 9am and headed out to Ocho Rios where we headed up into the mountains and our ears had to adjust to the altitude change. The view from in the mountains of the valley was absolutely AMAZING (even the temperature dropped during our drive through the mountains). We drove through Fern Gully where the sides of the streets are laden with fern and the trees form a canopy over the road.

We arrived at Mystic Mountain only to discover that it was a bit expensive, so we headed to Dunn's River. We stopped at the craft market and I bought a bag and a few other items made by the locals. I did not climb the falls because I climbed it a few times before. So I had to run up and down the stairs to take photos of the other students tackling the falls. It was funny to see the Barry people’s reaction to climbing the falls, especially Dr. Delpech’s. We hung out at the beach after climbing of the falls and ate food and watched the locals. While leaving we stopped by the Craft market at Dunn's River Fall’s where Whitney got lost trying to exit the craft market. After that we went to Margaritaville which was super expensive and the food wasn’t all that great.  


oops

3/9/2013

I forgot to sign my name to "Health Fair" & "Relax Day"

 

Jahneen Buckley


Dunns River

3/9/2013

These days just keep getting better. Today as part of our cultural immersion we went to Dunn's River in Ochos Rios on the northern coast of Jamaica. We climbed a waterfall that had to be 200 feet high, though it was a gradual elevation. I had so much fun racing up the rocks with the water crashing down, slipping every now and then into a pool of ice cold water. But the best part, by far, was watching Professor Delpech appear over the ridge, tour guide in hand, and look of sheer terror on her face. Despite her cries to her dear lord and savior to save her from the falls, she persevered through the entire length of the waterfall with gumption- she even beat me to the top.
 Because the intention of this trip was, not only to see the amazing natural beauty that the Jamaican countryside and coast has to offer but also, to see the difference between the tourist areas and the inner city. When most people visit Jamaica they go to resorts and stay there, never venturing into the cities or areas that the citizens actually live. Our trip in Kingston has been quite the opposite. Not only was today the first time we've even seen a resort, but we've been in the very heart of where the people live, eat, and treat their illnesses. And the difference is more than obvious. Besides the poverty and demeanor of the Jamaicans themselves changing, the expectations of us as visitors changes as well. Whereas in Kingston people aren't used to visitors, today we saw how traveling just 2 hours to a different city can change that dynamic completely. Not only were the natives more used to foreigners, and therefore more friendly, but the prices of restaurants and attractions reflected a much wealthier economy where money is more abundant.
 It was an interesting view on what and where money is spent here where the economy and resources are such an issue.

- Whitney 

Mountain, River, and Sea

3/9/2013

Today we experienced a different Jamaica, one with sun, mountains, river and the beautiful sea. It was an exiting and fun day. We traveled to Dunn's river fall thru a very narrow road, covered by mountains, and trees that exposed a beautiful Jamaica, one natural and extravagant. Once at Dunn's river fall we enjoyed the freshness of a waterfall splashing our faces and washing us from time to time as we tried to climb to the top, with the adrenaline of this exhilarating adventure, we walk down the stairs to the sun and embracing sea, and this is one of the most wonderful characteristics of this land, you can find just anything within such a limited area. After all this activity, we had lunch at Margarita Ville where we devour our meals, and head home to the beat of Reggae playing on the van that has taken us to so many places in this island. Everyone was just simply exhausted, and absorbed in the mountains that surrounded us the entire trip.
Loreta Gonzalez

Jamaica: Day 6 - Last Day Already

3/8/2013

        Wow! Did this week fly by! Friday already and it's our last day of in the clinical setting here in Jamaica. I can't believe how much we have learned and how much we have seen while we've been here. We spent half of the day at our clinical assignments and the remaining portion of the day going back to where it all began on Monday at Maxfield Park Health Centre. Today at my health clinic, Windward Road, I went on home visits with the public health nurse and the community health aid. It was an experience I'll never forget. I couldn't believe the conditions that people were living in. I was disturbed by the incredible amount of poverty, the high rate of teen pregnancy and rampant recreational drug use. The bright cloud in this perfect storm was the compassion, dedication and courage of the public health nurses. It was amazing to see them bringing healthcare to the homes of their patients, doing assessments in a one room shack, giving immunization vaccines right on the street and catching potentially harmful errors in patient's documentation by checking their immunization records right there in the front yard. I was amazed, impressed and inspired. I'd never seen anything like it. I thought to myself this is not an ideal situation but these nurses and community health aids epitomize what public health nursing is all about. 
       At the post conference at Maxfield, we had a great discussion about what we learned from our experience during this past week and shared our observations about the positives and negatives of the Jamaican public healthcare system in Kingston. The day was super long! now I'm ready for a relaxing weekend and a chance to see what Jamaica really has to offer.

Kelissa G.

Last Day in the Clinic

3/8/2013

Today was my last and most interesting day at Comprehensive Clinic. I was assigned to a different part of the clinic where I met people of all ages and a few student nurses. It was the first time I had the opportunity to meet and talk with the Nurse Practioners there at the clinic and see how they go about their day. I also was exposed to how the clinic here treats diarrhea and triage patients. After that the Community Health Nurses took us out on a tour to the neighboring community where we saw a barbershop, hairdresser and a mini mart. We also got to tour the area where residents are provided housing by the government and was shown the various fruit trees in the area. While in the nighborhood we looked at a few areas that could possibly be future sites for a health fair for the next N-SAP group.

After we left the clinic we went to Tastee's Patty where we had the most fingerlicking, mouthwatering, delicious patties. Then we listened to Jamaican music on our way to Maxfield Park Clinic. In the afternoon we returned to Maxfield Park Clinic where we met with nursing officials  and gave them an evaluation of their experience. The Public Health Nurses were more than happy to hear what we had to say.


Last Day in the Clinic

3/8/2013

I forgot to sign my name to my blog "Last Day in the Clinic"

 

Jahneen buckley


Day 5

3/7/2013

 Today was the BEST day in Jamaica yet. We all woke up early and ate our breakfasts’ and then spent some time organizing our items and supplies for the health fair that we are going to be having on Monday in Mandeville. After we were done we were off to the Bob Marley Museum, which was literally almost right down the street, and it was awesome. From the outside it looks very much like a tourist spot but I feel as if it is not at all. Inside the compound there is murals painted everywhere on the walls of the gate everywhere. There were pictures of Bob with his family, The Wailers and Bob, him in concert and murals painted of him and all of his sons. We paid our to tour the house and got a highly talented tour guide, Mikaela, who serenaded us and took us through the entire house and the outside. She showed us statues dedicated in memory of Bob. Then she showed us a mini garden that Rita Marley started, it had mint, lemon grass and marijuana and other plants.  I personally was shocked to see weed growing there knowing it is illegal and what it is used for. Anyways the original Tuff Gong studio is on the side of the house. Inside the house there are still the holes from the bullets that were shot through Bob’s house and it was inspiration for him to go to concert two days later despite doctors wishes. Speculation is that it was a political thing.  Through the front door are the original steps and stairs and wood flooring that was there when Bob was alive. His pictures, awards, and paraphernalia are displayed everywhere in the house.  There is a room with a hologram that is 5’6’’ inches. Upstairs is a room filled with newspaper clippings from his first appearance to his death. There is a replica of the original studio and bike he would ride to sell his album. Smack in the middle of the house is his room that appears to be left like he left it before he died with gifts he received from fans. There is a huge mural of a Rastafarian image in one room with a hammock and some drums in one corner. The kitchen, which weirdly is upstairs, has a gas/charcoal stove and wooden utensils and carved dried fruit skins hanging as decorations.  The final upstairs room has photos of his kids and their accomplishments. Outside in the back of the house is an old friend of Bob that is STILL living there; the guy is about 81 and still riding his bike. There is a tourist gift shop and a theatre, which showed a great summary of Bob’s life and accomplishments although it was cut off abruptly it, was very well done. After that we went to Port Royale to Gloria’s and everyone, but me, ate fish, lobster, and shrimp and enjoyed their food and I had to sit and watch and eat bunny food (cabbage and carrots). But the view is amazing and the breeze was blowing so I had a great time. After that we went to the museum but it was closed so we could not go in but got to take some great pictures with canons and the outside.


 Julia L. Cunningham


Cultural "Leisure" Day

3/7/2013

Oops! I forgot to sign my entry.  Cultural "Leisure" Day- Mara


Excursion

3/7/2013

Today we visited Bob Marley's museum. It was an interesting experience. I relearned what I knew about The Legend and picked up new information on his life during the tour. To know that one man's message of peace has spread all over the world it's amazing and inspiring at the same time. Our tour guide serenaded us with her beautiful voice with Bon Marley songs throughout the tour. We then went throughTrench Town, a place that's associated with Bob Marley & his music and then visited the recording studio that's owned by his family. 
After our tour we went to Gloria's in a fishing village called Port Royal. The food is absolutely AMAZING. As a matter of fact ALL the food here is AMAZING. My meal was worth the wait because it was thoroughly cooked & made with all these spices and herbs that would give my meal the taste that would satisfy my hunger. The member of the N-SAP group enjoyed our dinner amongst locals and other foreigners on a cool rooftop deck. 

After our meal at Gloria's we went to visitors historical site at Port Royal but arrived too late- they were closed. With promises to return another day we took pictures of canons and the outside of the ruins. Then we hopped back into our bus & enjoyed a very cool, windy & scenic drive into the hustle & bustle of the city of Kingston. Our last stop for the day was Devon's house to have some delicious Devon's House Ice Cream & local delicacies from the bakery. 

Jahneen Buckley 

Jamaica: Day 5 - Robert's House

3/7/2013

      Today will definitely be a day that I will not soon forget. After breakfast at the hotel we organized our supplies for the Health Fair we will be hosting on Monday and then we were off to Robert's House. Today I walked through the same halls in which Robert Nesta Mareley once lived. His home in Kingston is now the Bob Marley Museum. It was surreal and a little haunting to know that those very rooms were where he ate, slept and wrote some of the world's most recognizable lyrics. We saw the room that was his recording studio, his rehearsal room where he was wounded in an assassination attempt in 1976, his kitchen, and even his bedroom complete with his meditation mat, slippers and three Bibles translated into an Ethiopian language at this bedside. It was truly an amazing experience and I would recommend anyone that visits Jamaica to stop by the Bob Marley Museum. We also stopped by the notorious Trench Town one of Jamaica's most dangerous areas where Marley also lived for several years earlier in his life. 
       For lunch, we left Kingston and headed to historic Port Royal. We ate at Gloria's, famous for their seafood. We'll be visiting Port Royal again to tour it because it was closed today. We ended our cultural excursion with a stop at Devon House for ice cream. 

Kelissa G.

Cultural Experience Day

3/7/2013

Today was the first day that was fully dedicated to learning about the Jamaican

culture. Prior to us taking off for the day however, we spent around an hour

getting our supplies ready to be shipped for our health fair in Mandeville next

week. Initially we planned to take the supplies ourselves but a representative

from Northern Caribbean University from the Mandeville campus was in our area

and is transferring the items for us to save time.

 

Soon after we were in route to our first stop, the Bob Marley Museum! This was a very special event for me since I'm a pretty big fan of Marley's music. What I realized while viewing the exhibits in the museum, was that he was so much more than a singer. Bob Marley was a true artist that used his passion for singing to bring people from all corners of the world together. In his concert held in Milan, Italy in 1980, he packed the arena with over 100,000 people from all over the planet. His songs of peace and equality still play on the radios of many today and continue to poetry "one love".

 

Then it was time to depart the museum and head to Port Royal. This is a historic

area on the coast whcih at one time called "the richest and wickedest city in the world" because of the silk and gold trade in the 1600's. Pirates, who were at that time called "brethren of the coast," looted the near by ships Spanish ships for many years ago. We had a beautiful oceanic lunch with such foods as curried lobster, fried whole fish and many of the local favorite additions. The restaurant, named Gloria's, had been

recommended by many and it did not disappoint. After lunch we walked by a monument of old cannons that line the coast as if still protecting the borders. I couldn't help but to imagine how life for the local people when those cannons were in use.  


Best day ever

3/7/2013

 So, as you can probably tell- today has been the best day ever. We went to the Bob Marley museum and learned so much about this nation's hero. He was such a huge influence on all of Jamaican culture, you see it every day. As a fan, I obviously know how far-reaching his music is but when you really see all the videos, articles, and pictures of the man and what distance his music and his message carried, you realize how powerful the voice of one man can be. He preached love and peace to everyone, not just Jamaicans, and he wished for every person, no matter the race, gender, or religion to be united under the human condition. I am saddened that he died before he was able to see even a little of that accomplished. 
 After the museum we drove around the harbor to Port Royal, a historical site in Kingston. The drive was beautiful, you can see the water against a backdrop of mountains, nothing like Miami. When we arrived we went to Gloria's, the best seafood in Kingston. They catch the fish on the harbor, walk across the street to the restaurant, and cook and serve it. Needless to say, it took a long time (much like everything else in Jamaica) but it was well worth it. Between the lobster, shrimp, and fish 3 different ways I feel like we got a really good chance to experience multiple styles of Jamaican traditional cooking, and all were delicious. 
 After lunch, we drove to the fort at Port Royal. It is a historic site not just for the events that took place at the fort but also because it was destroyed during the biggest earthquake Jamaica has ever experienced. The buildings fell into the water and the walls crumbled. It was very pretty none the less. 
 As the sun was setting we drove back to our hotel, stopping at Devon House to get ice cream and souvenirs. I feel relaxed and fulfilled, happy that today we got to see the history that Kingston has to offer rather than the current situations that we've been seeing the rest of week. Tomorrow we head back to the clinic for our last day of volunteering. 
- Whitney

Cultural Experience Day

3/7/2013

Cultural Experience Day entry by Henry Cabrera

Enjoying Jamaica

3/7/2013

Today we had an amazing cultural experience. We visited Bob Marley's museum, and we got to see all his life in display, where he lived and created most of his music, after which we drove by Trench Town to see the house where he was born, and we also drove by his music studio. It was an exhilarating experience as security is not of outmost in that area. We had lunch on Port Royal where seafood and fish are simply heavenly delicious. The place is by the sea, and everything is impregnated with its smell. We also visited the old fort, but disappointingly it was already closed and we couldn't enter. Today was a different day, we got to be part of a legend, part of history, sea and music, today was a NO Problem man kind of day, I enjoyed Jamaica's beat. One love.

Cultural "Leisure" Day

3/7/2013

Today we got to sleep in a little more than the previous days because our professor decided to change the schedule slightly.  Rather than going to the community clinic we are having a cultural day.  Our day began by sorting out all of the supplies (dental floss, toothpaste, toothbrushes) we brought.  Once again our group worked well together to accomplish the task at hand quickly. 

After our morning task we went to the Bob Marley Museum (his home).  This was an amazing tour where we actually saw where he did his music recordings, where he liked to smoke under the tree,  his bedroom, and his old bike which he rode to sell his albums on the street.  I learned quite a few interesting facts such as: his father was a white man and I was totally clueless that he died from a rare skin cancer (melanoma).  What a talented man he was with a beautiful vision and message "one love one heart lets get together and feel alright."  Once the tour finished we went to his old home which was in Trench Town.  This was a quick "do not get out of the car tour.".  So we only took pictures and off we went to our next cultural experience.

The following stop was in Port Royal where we stopped at a restaurant named Gloria's.  This is famous for their fresh seafood.  I decided to get the fish soup which took me about 40 minutes to eat because of the spices.  I can't seem to get used to the spices of the island.  My ears, throat, and lips are on fire and I feel them pulsating, and my eyes water.  Everyone laughs at me. 

I really enjoyed today I believe that we have fulfilled a little part of the cultural experience only because I want to see and do more.  I am having a fantastic time with my great fellow classmates and my two wonderful professors.

 


Day Four- A familiar face!

3/6/2013

Today was another busy day at Comprehensive Health Center in Kingston. I watched mothers & babies being seem and examined by the nurses. It was a hard thing to see so many of those that were in need of medical help and had to wait for such a long time to receive it. To the locals it was the norm for them, while for me it seemed like an eternity. I had an interesting interview with a member of the clinic who told me about her life and the struggles that she had to go through. I was surprised that she was so open to discuss her personal life with me- a stranger. Listening to her speak has made me realise how fortunate I am to live in a country like the United States. Talking to this woman made me admire her courage and her strength that she has gained throughout the years because of her life experiences. 



Jahneen Buckley

Day 4

3/6/2013

Hey everyone I'm sorry that I didn't get to blog yesterday but the internet signal was horrible and non existent due to the rain yesterday so I couldn't share my amazing experience with you all. But yesterday was another day at the clinic, but today the specialty was mental/behavioral health instead of mother baby. So we got to sit with the nurses and observe them interview patients. It was pretty much the same interview that patients get when they are admitted to the hospital and is assessed in treatment planning, at least that's how it was when I did my psych rotation at IPMC. Patients seemed to be hesitant to admit that they had a behavioral health ailment, specifically schizophrenia, because people diagnosed with it receives shots IM and they would just deny being schizophrenia due to the fact that they didn't get "those shots". I thought it was pretty interesting fact. Other that I got to watch how this patient suffered from Parkinson's disease and he would make the "pill rolling" motions with his fingers and it was very apparent to me that it was distressing to have those uncontrolled motions and not be able to stop it. After that we went to the University hospital and it was very nice, I would compare it to our memorial hospitals. When we drove up to the entrance and stepped out the car it reminded me of the entrance at Memorial Regional because the entrance had students, workers, and patients galore. It is quite a huge facility as well. I noticed it was very well kept, had air conditioning and was more of what I familiarize myself with when I think of hospitals (closed housing, ac, bright lights, alcohol smell), whereas I felt that KPH felt more of being sick at my grandma's house (being in my pajamas with the windows open and the breeze blowing). There was A LOT of paperwork. It was an amazing experience and it made me realize how blessed we really are in the United States.

Julia L. Cunningham

 


Rainy day

3/6/2013

Today we did a some of the same as yesterday. We visit the University Hospital, which can be compared to our Jackson Memorial Hospital in the sense of purpose. We had a meeting this afternoon with the faculty, we were trying to get a sense of our perspectives, and it was very interesting to see how similar our thoughts are, and how eager we are to fix the world when in reality, little is in our hands. Today in the clinics I had the opportunity to help my nurse with the breathing treatments, and it felt like a factory operator, so many kids were coming and going, that there was not an interim between patients. By the time one finished treatment, the other was about to start his second, or third one, it was a hectic task, and I wonder how nurses do that on daily bases without someone helping them!!!! Now is raining, and I have to confess I'm a little home sick, once more today's experience made me think about everything we have and overlook everyday.

Another Day!

3/6/2013

Today was very similar to yesterday.  We visited our community clinics and we then went to University Hospital.  This hospital had much better conditions than the ones we saw yesterday because its a private hospital.  This hospital had more outside space where you saw the sick children playing in their indoor playground, pretty plants and flowers decorated different pathways, and of course the beautiful scenery of the mountains as your background.

Mara.

 


Jamaica: Day 4 - University Hospital

3/6/2013

           Its our fourth day here in Jamaica and I would say we are officially settled in and better accustomed to how things are done here. Today's itinerary mirrored yesterday's. We began the day at our respective assigned clinics and then we grabbed a quick lunch and then we spent the afternoon touring University Hospital which is the hospital associated with the University of the West Indies. This institution like Kingston Public was large but it was in far better condition. The different wards as they are called were more spacious, cleaner and better ventilated. The equipment was also more updated. One section of the hospital is privately owned and when we entered this unit it was like stepping out of Jamaica and into the States! As you can see in the picture below, the equipment and setting was completely modern. It was amazing to see the difference that having the proper funding and modern technology makes on how healthcare is provided. Tomorrow we get to have a much needed change in pace as we explore more of what Jamaican culture has to offer. Can't wait to tell you all about it. 

Kelissa G.


Rainy day

3/6/2013

I am writing you from rainy Jamaica after a very busy day. Today I experienced family planning in Jamaica- an extremely unique exposure. Whereas in America people are working to eradicate birth control, here they give it away for free on a weekly basis. 
 After the clinic, dr. Delpech and I went to home visits in swallow field, a poor neighborhood in Kingston. We saw the most interesting people in their homes and on their streets. The dynamic was truly different than any other I've seen. 
 I realized how blessed we are without even realizing it. I also saw a giant need for resources and supplies that we weren't able to see in the clinical area so that the next time we visit we will be able to bring them what they truly need.
Until tomorrow,
     Whitney

This is what I call public health experience

3/5/2013

Today we were ready at 7 to go into the different clinics. We were broken down in three groups and each group went to a different clinic. I went to the clinic which had the pediatric and maternity unit. Since I'm doing my pediatric rotation I asked the nurse in charge to assign me just pediatrics if possible, she agreed saying that " all the help we can get with the kids is more than welcome". The team was one nurse and one doctor plus myself. We saw around 50 patients only 32 of them being seeing by the doctor as well because she only had 32 appointments available for the day. It was a very productive day and I felt I was making a difference in those children lives. Everybody was very supportive and teaching me the different techniques they use to speed up the triage and curative process, which is how they call it here. Tomorrow we will be back for more.

Dayana Machado

Things just got real

3/5/2013

Today we realized what we've gotten ourselves into. It was an early start, we headed to the clinics and began our cultural assessments. Jahneen and I went to the post partum section while Henry headed to the chronic disease section. 
 We followed a patient through her physical exam and then the baby's exam. It was an eye opener to say the least. All of their equipment is used sparingly and repeatedly. They do a lot of teaching but with very few paper materials for the patients to take with them. And the privacy was practically nonexistent. At least 7 people walked into the office while we were performing an extremely invasive exam. While the primary care is free and accessible the wait is incredibly long (there were nearly 300 people in the waiting room when we arrived at 8am) and unfortunately the nurse's demeanor is not too pleasant. It felt more like the nurse was a mother instead of a teacher. But then again, maybe that's the way to reach the people of Jamaica- they are extremely advanced in the area of primary care as almost all of their population uses those services.
After the clinics we toured Kingston public hospital. I think we were all exhausted from the days work because we could not get out of there fast enough. Pretty much what I learned was we (and our patients) in American hospitals have absolutely nothing to complain about. These hospitals have no AC, the IV pumps are only for dialysis patients, and they had to push 30 extra beds onto a unit in order to accommodate their patient load. Let's see what fun things we discover tomorrow.

Whitney

Things just got Interesting!

3/5/2013

Now I can say that the trip has picked up steam and we're rolling! Today we were assigned to one of three different clinical sites in groups of two of three students. I was located in the Comprehensive Health Centre which is located just a few blocks away from where we are staying. This is a Type 5 centre, which is at the top level of health centres in Jamaica. This means that the centre is located in an area that is populated with about 150k individuals. At first we were only observing the centre's day to day operations but soon the us students jumped in and began to help the nurses on duty with their patient assessments. It was truly exciting to interact with the local Jamaican patient population and clinical staff.

Henry Cabrera


Day 3

3/5/2013

Today was a very exciting day, we all went to the clinics to see the real action... the work of the public health nurses. There were a total of 3 clinics that we went to, I visited with the Windward Clinic on Paradise St. I was both excited to get the experience from a Jamaican point of view in the clinics as well as nervous about what I would see. I have one thing to say and that is nurses are very highly respected here in Jamaica, no doubt about it. After we arrived we were introduced to the public health charge nurse and she gave us a complete tour of the facility. In the facility that I saw there was a dentist area, exam rooms, administrative offices, a mental health sections and various waiting areas. Everyone wanted to see the people from foreign and what we were there to do. Well I got to follow one public health nurse that examined children. Different days there are different services that are provided. Today happened to be a pediatric observation day as well as a antepartum check up day. The nurse asked very focused questions about nutrition, toileting behaviors, daily activity, observed the skin and palpated the abdomens and etc as needed based on what information they were given. EVERY single mother that went there needed to have her "passport" which is basically a book that keeps medical records for their child and also along with that they have their immunization papers that they NEED to bring and stay up to date. I also was lucky enough to get to accompany the public health aides to visit with 12 new mothers and their neonates. We went all around and everyone greeted us and was very nice. The purposes of the visits were to remind mothers to keep their appointments and immunizations in order. A few visits were to assess the needs of the patients based on the nurses primary concern and then determine the need for a follow up and a closer appointment date that the one assigned. Every encounter with a new mother or pregnant woman was the same, even those we came across on the journey was the same as well... when is your appointment and did you get your babies immunizations?.. I loved to see that they keep on top of them like that. Well until tomorrow... 



Julia L. Cunningham

Jamaican History

3/5/2013

This building is part of Kingston Public Hospital and dates back to the 1700's. We had the most amazing time touring almost the entire facility.

 


Pic Added

3/5/2013


Day Three

3/5/2013

Today we visited Kingston Public Hospital and Comprehensive Health Center it was an eye opening experience. The environment that the nurses have to work in are similar and somewhat different than that of the American public health nursing environment. It's amazing to see how the staff makes use of the resources that they have and provide quality care to the patients under their care. We also met several senior nursing students in the clinical area and they were more than happy to tell us about their Nursing program and the specialty degrees their schools offer. 



Jahneen Buckley

An eye opener experience

3/5/2013

Today's experience was an eye opener that make me realize how fortunate we are in our country, and the excess we are surrounded by. Today we stayed at the local clinics and interact with the nurses and patients. At the clinics certain days are assigned to certain treatment, and triage is done by the Doctors in the waiting room where people are seen according to the level of acuity, and those who are not acutely ill need to come back next week. We also had a tour of KPH one of the main hospital in Kingston, the facility was big, and we experienced first hand the differences of our health systems and how they operate, it was an incredible and unforgettable experience that would always be part of my practice.
Loreta Gonzalez



Yesterday

3/5/2013

Yesterday we met with the nurses from Maxfield Park Health Center.  These women are quite remarkeable and inspiring because of how much knowledge and passion they have in thier field.  They discussed briefly the health care system in Jamaica and then they told us what were some of the major health indicators.  Unfortunately, many of the health indicators in Jamaica are the same as in the states.  What I found particularly interesting was how they place a big importance on having vaccinations up to date.  When a person's vaccination schedule is not up to date the child's parents, teacher, and nurses will have fines imposed.  This is a major part of their primary prevention.  At the end of the presentation the nurse explained to us some of the problems they faced such as mens health, stigma of HIV positive mothers who can not breastfeed their babies due to the risk it may pose to the baby, and problems with access to health records.   The nurse concluded by asking us how some of these issues could be solved.  They listened to our ideas and took notes.  This really made me feel as part of their team not like a student because they respected our point of view and were interested in our ideas.

Mara:)

 


Jamaica: Day 3 - Grateful

3/5/2013

         Today our group was split up into twos and threes with each group visiting a different health clinic. My group went to the Windward Road Health Center. I followed a Midwife since that is my career interest. We learned that the health clinics in Jamaica assign a specific condition or patient group to a certain day of the week. For instance, today is Tuesday which is the day for well-child visits and immunizations, tomorrow is mental health day and so on. Today we were no longer orienting we we getting up close and personal with the Jamaican Public Healthcare system and there were many surprises in store for us. 
  I was pleased to see that nursing as a profession is universal and all the the concepts that we are learning are implemented by nurses in Jamaica and all around the world; what was unsettling however, was the conditions in which it was being practiced. The healthcare facilities here look nothing like we are used to seeing in the states. Offices and examination rooms are small, cramped, and often filled with outdated equipment. There is no Pyxis machine, so meds and vaccines are kept in a fridge or cooler. The waiting areas are always full. Patients are assigned an identification number which they must bring with them in order to locate their paper file called a docket when they arrive. 
          After the morning session at Windward Road we stopped by Juicy Patties for lunch and then we toured Kingston Public Hospital in the afternoon. This is the public hospital of Jamaica, care and prescriptions here are provided for free. This facility was huge! We walked around for almost two hours and did not see all of it. It is a multidisciplinary hospital which includes, an emergency department, med-surge, oncology, dialysis, gastroenterology, general surgery, intensive care and more. By the end of the tour, we were all ready to head back to the hotel to rest and reboot.
         When I saw up close and personal the condition in which these passionate nurses have to work I immediately began to feel so grateful for being able to study and soon practice in the US. Things that I've taken for granted, today has reminded me to be grateful for. From the cleanliness of our facilities, to the state of the art equipment and the use of technology especially electronic medical records we are truly blessed in the States.

Kelissa G.

Community Nursing 101

3/5/2013

     We started the day really early with a light breakfast and off we went to our different clinical sites.  The first site we went was called Glen Vincent this was a small clinic where today the nurses were seeing ob & pediatric patients.  Consequently, you saw many women and children.  The second site was called Comprehensive this was a larger facility.  Immediately upon arrival you see many of the locals waiting outside, easily there could have been about 100 or more people sitting on benches.  The last community site was Windward Road this was the site where Julia, Kelissa, and I stayed and worked.  This was another large facility with dental, ob, mental health, pediatrics, and curative health.  The first thing I noticed was the limited resources available.  A cotton ball is split up to use among two or three patients, the urine specimen was taken in any small container (usually empty medicine bottles) then it was discarded in the bathroom where there had a bucket of water and bleach only to reuse once again, glucose readings where done once even though at times they questioned the reading,  medicine was dispensed and the plastic cup  used was recycled to be used again,  and gloves were rarely worn even though you were dealing with blood and urine.  These small obstacles do not impede the nurses from providing effective and excellent care to their patients.  Another interesting difference is the lack of privacy when providing care.  The care is provided in a small room with 2 nurses and 2 patients, just outside the open door there are about 8 more patients waiting to be seen and they can hear everything that is going on inside the room.  The only thing I would like is to have the opportunity to do more hands on. 

     After the clinic we toured Kingston Public Hospital.  Wow!!!  I was shocked!  The patients hospitalized were separated by gender and by units orthopedic, renal, oncology, ICU, and med-surge.  The floor had about 25-30 beds and again privacy non existant.  The conditions of the hospital are no where to the standards we are used to seeing in the states however it doesn't prevent the nurses from doing their jobs.  During our tour we encountered some senior nursing students working in the different units. 

     This was an amazing experience and all of the people we encountered are friendly and welcoming.  There are many who criticize our health care system in the States after seeing the hospital and the clinical setting we should consider ourselves lucky on the way our health care system is set up.

Mara.

 


Day two

3/4/2013

I visited Devon's House & Maxfield Park Clinic today. It was an experience to see how the Jamaican health system works. Meeting Public Health Nurses today and learning about another healthcare system showed me that there are other things that we can both learn and also improve both healthcare systems. I'm now even more excited for our second day tomorrow when we will tour a major hospital and work in the local clinical setting.

Jahneen Buckley

The work begins

3/4/2013

Today we started early, we went to Maxfield Park Health Center for orientation. We discussed some of the public health issues here in Jamaica and I personally found out they are very similar to ours in the United States, with the exception of technology which is not an issue for us at home. We had a tour thru the premises and I was able to witness first hand how different is the attention, the waiting period and the whole process to get medical attention. It was a very eye opening experience, one that makes me appreciate what we have in our country.
Loreta Gonzalez

Jamaica: Day 2 - Orientation

3/4/2013

          Though its our second day in Jamaica, today marks our first full day here. We began the day with a light breakfast at the hotel and off we were to the Maxfield Park Health Center to officially learning about the Jamaican Healthcare system. The orientation consisted of presentations given by Jamaican public health nurses which gave us an overview of the history of the healthcare system in Jamaica and its current organizational structure. Among the presenters was the Public Health Nursing Administrator for the South East Region of the country. The Ministry of Health, we learned, has divided the country into four regions and each has someone responsible to manage that area. Each region is further divided into zones with a Public Health nurse in charge of each that reports to the nurse in charge of the region and she reports to the ministry of health. 
          We learned about many of the milestones and advances that Jamaica has made over the years in healthcare and we collaboratively discussed what some solutions might be to some current healthcare issues that they are facing. Among Jamaica's proudest achievements is its extremely high, about 95%, immunization rates. As a result, they have been able to eradicate many diseases island. One of the challenges we discussed was the need for and electronic health record for patients. Below is a glimpse of what not having one looks like. It's bulky, consumes space, and health care providers in different parts of the island do not easy access to their patients charts if they are coming to them from another part of the country.
          All in all, it was a provocative talk and a great way to start our journey in Jamaican healthcare. What I appreciated most was seeing the passion and enthusiasm the nurses have Public health. They absolutely love promoting primary prevention in their communities, they love their people and they love Jamaica and for me that kind of passion is infectious. I was inspired and reminded once again, THIS is what healthcare is all about.

We toured the facilities after the lecture and enjoyed an authentic Jamaican lunch at Scotchies a great local restaurant with beautiful outdoor seating. Then for dessert, it was off to the historical Devon House Plantation, built in 1881, where we enjoyed their famous ice-cream. 

Till next time,

Kelissa G.


Second day in Kingston, Jamaica

3/4/2013

Our journey finally started today! We woke up and had some breakfast and our driver was ready at 9:30 to take us to our meeting in Maxfield Park Health Center. When we arrived one of the faculty me member from NCU was waiting for us. Around 10, orientation started. A group of 4 community public health nurses had a fantastic presentation prepared for us. They explained the basic principles of public health care in Jamaica and how important is their job in maintaining a healthy community. They were very proud on the rigorous immunization program they established for the children from birth. This program has helped tremendously in eradicate communicable diseases such polio and measles in the country. After the presentation we had a your throughout the facility. All staff, nurses, and doctors were very kind and happy that we are going to be able to experience public health in Jamaica. We are looking forward to our upcoming visits to the health centers to experience this wonderful interaction between these two
Cultures.

Dayana MAchado

day 2

3/4/2013

whagwan from Jamaica! today we had a lovely orientation from the nurses at Maxfield park. we learned about, not only the needs of the jamaican health care system, but also the areas in which they excell. I have learned that though their tertiary care lacks in many areas, they are leaders in preventative care- something that Americans could certainly learn from. 
 I am having a great time visiting the different hotspots of Kingston. so far we've seen their grocery store, historical parks, and their version of best buy. all have been uniquely different while pleasantly similar. I can't wait to see our clinical sites tomorrow.

Whitney Hawkins 

First day in Jamaica!

3/3/2013

The day has finally arrived! All the group met at the airport along with Dr. Delpech and Dr. Mcgregor. We arrived to Jamaica around 6 and the Dean from NCU was waiting for us at the airport. She welcomed us and said we will have an amazing experience. We arrived to the hotel and experienced some Jamaican food! We will be up early and ready  tomorrow to being our journey!

Dayana Machado

The arrival

3/3/2013

Here we are at dinner in Jamaica. The flight was quick, the weather is perfect, the drive was without problems, and our rooms are right by the pool. Pretty much- we couldn't ask for a better arrival. 
 Now I'm enjoying some spicy pepper pot soup and a traditional Jamaican drink while I wait for my curry chicken. 
I am so thrilled to be here and everyone's positive attitude is making me feel like this is going to be a wonderful time. Updates will come soon!

-Whitney Hawkins

First Day

3/3/2013

Today was a long exciting day! So much to see and eat in Jamaica! Just had some delicious food with the rest of the N-SAP group. Such warmth & kindness from the people of Jamaica! 

WE HAVE ARRIVED:)

3/3/2013

Hello Hello!!

After a long 6 weeks of meetings and preparations we finally arrived.  Everything went well with "no problems."  We are all tired after a long week of exams, clinicals, and travel.  So far the dinner at the Hotel Four Seasons is delicious.  A little spicy for my taste but delicious.  Can't wait for tomorrow to see and explore more of this beautiful island.  Good night everyone.

Mara

 


Barry Nursing is in Jamaica!

3/3/2013

After many weeks of meeting and planning, the Barry N-SAP has finally made it to Jamaica. We arrived with just enought time to have a beautiful first evening dinner together. Now we're all excited for tomorrow morning when we will awake for our first visit to the local community and begin our nursing objectives. While here in Jamaica, the students from the N-SAP group will use this blog to give our fellow Barry faculty and classmates the oppourtunity to enjoy the trip with us. For those of you who check in, please encourage all your Barry student friends to also sign in and experience this great adventure together with us. We have all our friends and families in our hearts and minds. Thanks!

Henry Cabrera


Arrival to Jamaica

3/3/2013

And we finally are in Jamaica, after weeks of preparations and orientation, and a few bumps along the road, we are finally here!!!!! We arrived at night, and at the airport everything went smooth. Everyone is very friendly and polite. The environment reminds me of my place of birth, Cuba, and I feel a little nostalgic.We tried the local food for the first time and it was obviously delicious, and SPICY!!!!!! Tomorrow we have a big day ahead of us, and I am very excited about it.

Loreta

Jamaica: Day 1

3/3/2013

          So we've been preparing for this trip to Jamaica for weeks, but it didn't really hit home that I'd be leaving the country until the night before. Last night was the first time I felt any anxiety about the trip. But once I checked in at the gate and held my boarding pass in my hand, I was officially in island mode! We caught the end of the Knicks-Heat game at the gate which was awesome. The flight was short and below is a picture I took while on board during our descent into Jamaica! Isn't it gorgeous?!
           When we finally got here, I surprisingly did not feel as if I had left the US. It just didn't hit me yet...maybe it still hasn't. Our driver picked us up at the airport and we were off to our hotel. Everyone so far as has been really friendly. Our hotel is awesome and for dinner I had a pan seared coconut Snapper with steamed veggies and baked potatoes! Don't you wish you were here!
            Tomorrow is orientation! We'll keep you posted on all the latest! Until then "Don't worry bout a ting"


--Kelissa G.

Day 1

3/3/2013

So far it has been a great start. We all arrived at Ft Lauderdale Airport and checked in with no problems at all, TSA checked us out under the metal detectors and unfortunately there were no signs despite the signs of a K9 unit. We progressed on after that and went to our gate and waited patiently for our plane to arrive and board. Meanwhile the airplane folk sat and fiddled with their iPads and iPhones, while I sat there with my lowly PURPLE iPod. Some of our classmates were lucky to enjoy the Heat game (which I'm proud to say they won). Shortly after that we were informed that it was time to board the plane and we anxiously shot up and got in line. I swear as I was passing first class I saw Movado sitting down, maybe it was just me (or not). Anyways the plane ride was short and sweet, I sat by the window and got a great view of the border of Jamaica and believe me when I say I was not disappointed. We arrived safely and went through customs with no problem and received our luggage with no problems. Cool island breeze greeted us as we excited the airport along with an awesome greeting sign saying "Welcome Barry University". The dean of NCU and an associate came to greet us. We left the airport and our driver was softly playing reggae and recommended some places to eat. After about a 20 minute drive we arrived to our hotel (Hotel Four Seasons) and checked in, got to our rooms and ..... it was like YES!!!! The rooms are cosy and nicely accommodating to our technologically savvy selves. We had dinner on the veranda of the hotel. I ate chicken and peas with french fries and had a twisted fruit punch. Well that's all until tomorrow, my wake up call will be "Three Little Birds on My Doorstep". 



Julia C.

Last Orientation Meeting

2/25/2013

This is our last orientation meeting before we leave to Jamaica.  The students are excited and they are looking forward to their immersion experience.  We would like to thank Dr. Claudette Chin for providing lunch and to the faculty and staff for joining us for lunch (Jerk Chicken, Rice and Peas, Jamaica variation of a salad (cucumber, tomatoes, and onion), Fruitcake with Run and Raisin and Grape Nut Icecream).

Dr. D.


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1/21/2013

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