myBarry
  • Create admissions profile
  • Check on application status
Admissions
Links
Connect with us
facebook
twitter
instagram
google+

Research and Science

A key skill for every health care professional is understanding the research process and translating it to the care of patients. All students in the College of Health Sciences – undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral students – have access to researchers and scholars in many health professions. For example, the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies serves as a forum for researchers throughout Barry University to collaborate on scientific projects. The Center for Nursing Research is a resource for nursing students and faculty to share scientific skills and support each other’s scholarly endeavors. The following showcases some of the research produced by our students and faculty

Dissertation Abstracts

Alexander Delpech, Paula (2009)
The Lived Experience Of Motherhood For African American Adolescent Mothers

Beason, Ferrona A. (2010)
The Influence Of Knowledge, Attitudes, And Health Beliefs On The Utilization Of Breast Cancer Screening Tools Among Urban Jamaican Women

Chin, Claudette R. (2011)
Caribbean Women Who Failed In Vitro Fertilization Treatment: A Phenomenological Inquiry

Colvin, Mary Katherine (2009)
The Meaning Of Professionalism Of Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Phenomenological Inquiry

Hackett, Virginia (2013)
The Effect of a Refresher Program upon the Professional Role Confidence Level of Transitioning Returnee Nurses.

Hershorin, Indra R. (2009)
Risk Perception and SelfEfficacy of 4th and 5th Grade Children Preand PostTest an Educational Intervention as Predictors Of Behavioral Intention to Reduce Risk for Developing Type2 Diabetes

Lamet, Ann R. (2006)
The Relationship Among Selected Risk Factors, Resilience and Psychological Distress of Older Women Who Are Holocaust and NonHolocaust Survivors In The Post 9/11 Environment

LePage, Carolyn T. (2008)
The Lived Experience of Individuals Following en Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Phenomenological Inquiry

McCarthy, Lolita (2013)
The Simultaneous Experiences of Being a Nurse Faculty Member and PhD Student: A Phenomenological Inquiry

McFadden, John J. (2008)
The Experience of Coming Out of a Marriage: A Phenomenological Inquiry

Rice, Donna L. (2012)
Critical Influences That Affect Nursing Faculty's Utilization of Clinical Simulation As a Teaching/Learning Methodology

Shaw, Mureen (2011)
Prostate Screening Practices Among Jamaican Men

Spalding, Claudette M. (2002)
Willingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education, University Affiliation, and Nursing Students' Spirituality

Umadhay, Lonar Anthony (2010)
African American Women Living With Hiv/Aids: A Phenomenological Inquiry

Abstract

The Lived Experience Of Motherhood For African American Adolescent Mothers
Paula Alexander Delpech
Barry University, 2009
Chairperson: Dr. Andra Hanlon

Background: African American adolescents are becoming pregnant and giving birth in disproportionate numbers, despite the decline in the general rate of adolescent pregnancy. While African American adolescents account for only 14 % of the teenage population, births to African American teenagers account for 28 % of all births and 47 % of all births to unmarried teenagers. Although there is a recognized salient connection between the high rates of adolescent motherhood among African Americans and the population's mothering beliefs, patterns and attitudes, it is a complex phenomenon that continues to present challenges to researchers and provokes debate among policymakers and health care providers. The true experience of mothering and its perception among African American adolescent mothers has received little attention and has led to inconsistent public policies and programs that are unable to address the complex realities of the lives of these mothers.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and gain a deeper understanding of the lived experience of motherhood from the perspectives of African American adolescent mothers.

Theoretical Framework: van Manen's phenomenological approach was used to guide this study.

Method: Eleven African American adolescent mothers participated in semistructured, audiotaped interviews. The seven procedural steps outlined by Colaizzi were used for data analysis.

Results: Five themes depicting the meaning of motherhood from the perspective of African American adolescent mothers emerged. The five themes were (a) motherhood is difficult, (b) motherhood is redefining life, (c) motherhood is hope, (d) motherhood is focusing on material things, and (e) motherhood is relying on baby. The findings revealed that motherhood for African American adolescent mothers involves overcoming a difficult transition, redefining one's life by making changes in one's life. Motherhood is coming to terms with past behaviors and recognizing the need to create new experiences. Motherhood further means acquiring new dreams and hopes for a better life for the mothers and their children.

Implications: Future discussions of the transition to motherhood for adolescent mothers, especially for African American adolescents, should be grounded in continued research concerning their developmental stage within their social context.

Back to top

Abstract

The Influence Of Knowledge, Attitudes, And Health Beliefs On The Utilization Of Breast Cancer Screening Tools Among Urban Jamaican Women
Ferrona A. Beason
Barry University, 2010
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background: Over the past few years, mortality rates from breast cancer have been on the incline in the island of Jamaica, and a large percentage of women affected have been diagnosed with breast cancer in the late stages of the disease. Although the availability of screening, most notably mammography, has improved in the last decade, only approximately 4% of women in Jamaica within the recommended age group utilize this screening tool.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and health beliefs of urban Jamaican women regarding breast cancer screening and to identify variables such as age, socioeconomic status, education, family history of breast cancer, and religion that may influence the utilization of breast cancer screening tools among these women.

Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the major framework for this study, and the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence was used as a cultural lens to study this population.

Methods: A crosssectional, correlational design was used to examine the relationship among the major study variables. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, and multiple regression statistics. A priori power analysis estimated a sample of 115 women for this study.

Results: Four hypotheses were tested for relationships among the variables. Predictor variables were age, level of education, socioeconomic status, religion, knowledge, attitudes, and health beliefs. Of these variables, the age of the participant, barriers to BSE, socioeconomic status and family history of breast cancer were found to be significant predictors of utilization of breast cancer screening tools among this sample of urban Jamaican women.

Conclusions: It is hoped that the results from this study will be used by nurses and other healthcare providers to develop and implement culturally appropriate interventions to reduce the morbidity and mortality rates of breast cancer among urban Jamaican women.

Back to top

Abstract

Caribbean Women Who Failed In Vitro Fertilization Treatment: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Claudette R. Chin
Barry University, 2011
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background: Ethnic minorities, like the Caribbean female population, have been seeking In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) treatments, yet there is paucity in the nursing literature exploring this phenomenon. The unique experiences of Caribbean women who failed IVF treatments have not been described and, as a result, are poorly understood.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the lived experience of Caribbean women who failed IVF treatment.

Methods: A qualitative methodology in the tradition of phenomenology was warranted to answer the following research question, "What is the lived experience of Caribbean women who failed IVF treatment?" The hermeneutic phenomenological approach by Van Manen (1990) directed this qualitative inquiry. Criterion sampling was utilized to select 12 women who selfidentified as having failed at least one IVF treatment in the last three years, prior to initiation of the study, residing in south Florida, at least 18 years of age, able to speak and read English, and willing to speak about their experience of failed IVF treatment were interviewed. Data was analyzed following the Van Manen approach.

Results: The related themes of disintegrating, disheartening, perpetuating, and guarding emerged as a total representation of the Caribbean women's life with failed IVF treatment.

Conclusion:This research study chiefly exposed the depth of the challenges confronting these Caribbean women with failed IVF treatment and the multiple losses that were imposed. Another significant dimension of this experience of failed IVF treatment was the search for meaning, which they were compelled to address in order to move forward in their respective lives.

Back to top

Abstract

The Meaning Of Professionalism Of Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Mary Katherine Colvin
Barry University, 2009
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background:Evidence suggests that professionalism is becoming problematic in programs of nursing across the country. Behaviors associated with this problem range from coming late to class, verbal insults, abuse and intimidation, physical and emotional harassment, cheating and other forms of dishonesty in the class and clinical settings. These actions are in opposition to the characteristics of a professional nurse as described in the Code of Ethics. Civility, or acting with respect and compassion for. The problem in this study was a concern for civil behavior of students as it impacts professionalism.

Purpose: to explore the meaning of professionalism in the lived experience of baccalaureate nursing students

Philosophical Underpinnings: van Manen Phenomenology

Method: A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used to explore the meaning of professionalism in the life world of 12 baccalaureate nursing students. van Manen's methodological structure for human science and writing guided the description and interpretation of findings.

Results: The meaning of professionalism was revealed through the themes of image, attitude and integrity. These themes illuminated the essences of professionalism as a way of being in time. Themes and essences were conceptualized using Carper's (1978) and White's (1995) ways of knowing in nursing. Further insights were drawn from literature in the areas of generational theory, the sociopolitical context of professionalism, student attitudes, and issues of integrity

Implications: Future directions for addressing civility as one dimension of professionalism are discussed with an emphasis on understanding the unique needs of young adults as the future leaders in the profession of nursing.

Back to top

Abstract

The Effect of a Refresher Program upon the Professional Role Confidence Level of Transitioning Returnee Nurses.
Virginia Hackett
Barry University, 2013
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background: The ever increasing nursing shortage could be alleviated by recruiting and preparing out of practice registered nurses (RNs) to care for the anticipated expanding aging population. Nurses who have taken a hiatus from the nursing workforce must again overcome the issue of confidence about their role as a practicing professional nurse in order to transition back as safe, competent health-care workers that instill public trust.

Purpose: To test the Transition Model among a group of RNs participating in a refresher program with the intent to re-enter nursing practice after a period of not working in the acute care environment. This study tested the hypothesis that returning registered nurses enrolled in a RN Refresher Program will develop improved self-confidence in their role as a professional nurse as they transition through the supportive refresher program.

Theoretical Framework: The chosen theoretical framework for this study was Transition Theory by Afaf Meleis.

Methods: A pre/post-test quantitative correlational design was used to examine the effects of a refresher course upon the confidence level of returnee RNs enrolled in a RN Refresher Program.  Data derived from the Life Experience Survey was compared to an enrollee’s margin in life score to detect any facilitators or inhibitors to the transition experience.  Data was analyzed using bivariate correlation, multiple regression, and dependent t-tests statistics.

Results: Three hypotheses were tested for relationships among the variables.  The instruments for confidence and life experience had usable data for this sample,  however, the margin in life scale did not, which adversely affected hypothesis one and hypothesis two and therefore were not supported.  Regression analysis found that 31.0% (R2 = .310, adj R2 = .12) of the variance was explained by the model, but the model was not significant, F (5,18) = 1.62, p = .21.  Examination of the beta weights revealed that none of the predictor variables contributed to the model.  Hypothesis 3 was supported by this study.  The confidence level scores pre- and post-refresher program were significantly increased.  On average, participants experienced significantly greater professional role confidence following the RN Refresher program (M = 18.90, SE = .47) than they did prior to the program (M = 14.21, SE = .50), t (94) = -11.09, p = .000, and the effect size was large, r = .75.

Conclusion: It is hoped that the results from this study will be used by nurse recruiters when evaluating a returnee nurse for future employment for their healthcare organization.  It is also hoped that information from this study is used by refresher program providers for potential grant acquisitions for the underserved returnee nurse population.

Back to top

Abstract

Risk Perception and SelfEfficacy of 4th and 5th Grade Children Preand PostTest an Educational Intervention as Predictors Of Behavioral Intention to Reduce Risk for Developing Type2 Diabetes
Indra R. Hershorin
Barry University, 2009
Chairperson: Dr. Pegge Bell

Background: Worldwide, among children and adolescents, type2 diabetes has increased parallel to the increase of overweight and obesity in the past two decades.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to test the relationships among the variables internal to the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model, risk perception selfefficacy, and behavioral intention and one variable external to the theory, gender. The second purpose was to examine the effect of an educational session on type 2 diabetes on the theoretical variable of behavioral intention.

Theoretical Framework: The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model.

Methods: A descriptive, preexperimental, onegroup pretestposttest design. A type2 diabetes educational session was tested with a convenience sample of 4th and 5th grade children (n = 166) at four elementary schools in MiamiDade County. Four hypotheses were tested using correlational technique, independent ttest, and regression analysis.

Results: The majority of children (n = 110, 69.2%) in this study reported having no knowledge about type2 diabetes. The findings partially supported the theoretical relationships of the adapted HAPA model. Posttest behavioral intention scores (M = 9.48) were significantly higher than pretest (M = 7.98) scores following the educational session on type2 diabetes.

Conclusions: Further research is needed and the instruments must undergo more rigorous psychometric testing for use with ethnically diverse children. Early and ageappropriate interventions by healthcare professionals to educate children about this growing problem may increase knowledge and reduce the risk for developing type2 diabetes.

Back to top

Abstract

The Relationship Among Selected Risk Factors, Resilience and Psychological Distress of Older Women Who Are Holocaust and Non-Holocaust Survivors In The Post 9/11 Environment
Ann R. Lamet
Barry University , 2006
Dissertation Chair: Dr. Linda K. Perkel

Older adults and older Holocaust survivors lived through World War II and experienced or witnessed devastating events. Over the years, some have coped well and demonstrated resilience, whereas others have continued to experience symptoms of posttraumatic stress. These individuals are once again confronted with a potential threat to their safety. In wake of the national trauma that occurred on September 11, 2001, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between trait anxiety, sense of safety regarding terrorism, resilience and psychological distress in the post 9/11 environment for two groups that are known to be at high risk for psychological distress: Older adults and older Holocaust survivors. It is believed that the knowledge gained from community dwelling female older adults and older Holocaust survivors will assist nurses in developing specific interventions for individuals who are experiencing adverse reactions to the threat of terrorism A comparative survey design was used for this study. Participants completed a researcher designed demographic tool, a Resilience Scale, a Trait Anxiety Inventory, Sense of Safety Regarding Terrorism Scale, and the Trauma Symptom Checklist (TSC-33). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, MANOVA to compare groups, and multiple regression to assess the relationship of the predictor variables to psychological distress. Holocaust survivors reported significantly more anxiety and greater posttraumatic sympymotology than the non-Holocaust survivor group. The relative contributions of the predictors to posttraumatic symptomotalogy scores were as follows: the largest significant contributor was anxiety, followed by sense of safety, and survivor status. Resilience did not provide a significant contribution. Specifically, greater anxiety, lower sense of safety, as self reported post 9/11, and being a Holocaust survivor were related to increased posttraumatic symptomatology scores.

Back to top

Abstract

The Lived Experience of Individuals Following Roux en Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Carolyn T. LePage
Barry University, 2008
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie M. Colin

Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is an increasingly popular intervention targeted to the severely obese to induce permanent weight loss. Achievement of post operative goals requires adaptation of physical, social, and psychological domains.  The phenomenon of navigating, maintaining, and living with post surgical changes is difficult to comprehend. 

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of the individual following gastric bypass surgery.  The researcher sought to enable the voices of the individuals who has undergone this phenomenon to be heard. 

Theoretical Framework: In order to fully describe the experience and increase awareness of the needs of the post-operative bariatric surgery patient, the researcher utilized a phenomenological perspective to guide the study. The work of van Manen (1990) served as both philosophical underpinnings and research method to guide this study.

Research Methods:  The hermeneutic phenomenological process described by van Manen (1990) served as the methodology.  While not prescriptive van Manen offers six activities to guide phenomenological inquiry.  These are: turning to a phenomenon; investigating the experience as we live it rather than we conceptualize it; reflecting on the essential themes which characterize the phenomenon; describing the phenomenon through the art of writing and rewriting; maintaining a strong and oriented relation to the phenomenon and balancing the research context by considering parts and whole.

Results: Twelve individuals who had undergone Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery between 1998 and 2005 were interviewed.    One overarching theme of paradox emerged. Four themes evolved through data analysis: surgery as renewed hope, finding balance, filling the void, and transformation of self-image.  Participants described the post-surgical experience as a time of rapid transformation.  All four lifeworlds as described by van Manen: spatiality, corporeality, temporality, and relationality were affected.

Conclusions: Recommendations for future studies include the exploration of the link between obesity and addiction and the issue of transfer of addiction as a means of filling the void after surgery. The insights acquired through this study may serve to aid nurses in advocating for bariatric patients, promoting health, and in delivering competent nursing care across the continuum of obesity and bariatric surgery.

Back to top

Abstract

The Simultaneous Experiences of Being a Nurse Faculty Member and PhD Student: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Lolita McCarthy
Barry University, 2013
Chairperson: Jessie Colin

Background: Doctoral education defines academic achievement in most disciplines including the nursing profession. For nurses committed to excellence in nursing education, research, and practice, doctoral education is a desired professional goal. For nurse educators, doctoral education is the path by which teaching needs of the profession are fulfilled. Unfortunately, less than 1% of nurses hold a doctoral degree.  One of the challenges faced by deans and program directors of schools and colleges of nursing is to devise strategies to expedite doctoral education that will produce qualified doctoral faculty to prepare future generations of nurses.

Purpose: The purpose of the study, using the phenomenological approach, was to explore the simultaneous experiences of being a faculty member and Ph.D. student and to uncover the essence and gain a deeper understanding about the phenomenon.

Methods: The researcher used hermeneutic phenomenology, the interpreting and understanding of the human experience, guided by van Manen's method to analyze the data. The participants were asked to describe their experiences as well as any rewards and challenges of being a faculty member and nursing doctoral student simultaneously.  The data were analyzed for themes and structure of meanings that will eventually lead to a description of the essence of the phenomenon.

Results: Six related themes of role confusion, lack of time, sacrifices, painful process, in need of support, and new perspective emerged as a result of this phenomenological investigation. These themes illuminated the nurse faculty members' experiences
of simultaneously being a nurse faculty member and PhD student, and Stark's (2004) middle range theory of meaning provided a framework for gaining a deeper understanding of this phenomenon.

Conclusion: This research study revealed the challenges and rewards of being a nurse faculty member and PhD student simultaneously and the participants' effort to find meaning in their journey through the doctoral process. The findings of this study highlighted the essence of their experiences by revealing that the obstacles, sacrifices, time constraints, and pain of pursuing a PhD; they embraced numerous positive aspects of the experience including professional and personal growth and an overwhelming sense of accomplishment. Therefore, understanding the depth of how this experience affected the nurse faculty members can be fundamental in eliciting support and understanding on the journey towards the PhD.

Back to top

Abstract

The Experience of Coming Out of a Marriage: A Phenomenological Inquiry
John J. McFadden
Barry University, 2008
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background: Coming out as a gay man frequently involves discrimination and numerous risks. If the individual is in a heterosexual marriage, the process and risks are even more complicated. The stressors involved threaten the health of both the gay man and his family, introducing a sense of vulnerability for all involved. This may lead to depression, suicide, substance abuse, unsafe sex practices, social ostracization and spiritual turmoil. Therefore, this life event and its potential for vulnerability are concerns for professional nurses.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and interpret the lived experiences of gay men who come out of heterosexual marriages as an initial step to understanding this life event. The research question was: What is the lived experience of being a gay man who comes out of a marriage?

Methods: A hermeneutic phenomenological tradition was used to identify, describe, and uncover the meaning structures of this lived experience. van Manen's (1990) methods and philosophy served as the main guide for data collection and analysis. The face to face interview was used as the data collection tool. The ten participants interviewed were gay men, 18 years of age or older, formerly married to women, and now divorced.

Results: A global theme of movement over time permeated the physical, psychological, social and spiritual aspects of the participants' beings. Subthemes included: 1) fear of the unknown, 2) breaking free and, 3) redefining self and settling in. The themes contained the essential attributes of a transition. This study extends the use of Melies et al.'s (2000) middle range theory of transitions as a means of understanding the lived experience of coming out of a marriage as a gay man.

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that nurses and other health care providers may view the lived experience of coming out of a marriage as a developmental transition in need of assessment and intervention to support a positive outcome. This study may also assist nurses in identifying those at risk for vulnerability and impaired health; provide data for constructing treatment plans and resources; and assist those providers seeking to create safe, supportive, and nonbiased practice environments for all patients.

Back to top

Abstract

Critical Influences That Affect Nursing Faculty's Utilization of Clinical Simulation As a Teaching/Learning Methodology
Donna L. Rice
Barry University, 2012
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background: Nurse educators are faced with addressing the challenge of finding optimal educational opportunities for nursing students to obtain the critical thinking skills needed to care for patients with increased acuity, amplified by changes in the complexity of health care delivery systems, technology, and biomedical knowledge. Schools of nursing can meet these challenges as well as address the critical nursing shortage, including nursing faculty, by incorporating innovative teaching approaches such as clinical simulation. Underutilization of this teaching methodology is a problem that bears scrutiny.

Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study, using the tradition of grounded theory, was to explore the factors that critically influence nursing faculty utilization of clinical simulation as a teaching/learning methodology.

Methods: A grounded theory approach provided the framework for this study.  Open-ended questions were used to collect data in accordance with this theory.  Interviews were audio-taped and semi-structured in accordance with this tradition.  Data were collected and analyzed in accordance with grounded theory tradition, using open, axial, and selective coding.

Results: The central core category that evolved from the data was amelioration.  Three dominant themes emerged from the data and supported this core category: support, believing, and transforming. This conceptual model can be used to better understand faculty needs and provide impetus to utilize simulation in nursing education, therefore increasing and optimizing the use of this teaching methodology.

Back to top

Abstract

Prostate Screening Practices Among Jamaican Men
Mureen Shaw
Barry University, 2011
Chairperson: Dr. Carolyn Le Page

Background: Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among Jamaican men. Clinical research conducted in Jamaica reveals that most Jamaican men are diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer at the time of diagnosis. Most men are symptomatic by the time they seek medical care and are diagnosed at later stages than are their contemporaries in other countries, resulting in higher morbidity and mortality rates.

Purpose: The goal of this clinical capstone study was to explore the current prostate screening practices in Jamaica, survey the health care providers regarding their knowledge and screening practices for prostate cancer, and identify the knowledge and perceptions of prostate health and cancer screening practices among a group of Jamaican men aged 35-75 years of age.

Theoretical Framework. Pender's Model of Health Promotion.

Methods. In four distinctive phases, the researcher compiled data through personal interviews, Survey Monkey questionnaires, and focus-group interactions. The data was gathered to elicit information regarding these men's health and prostate cancer screening practices. Utilizing mixed methods research practices, the researcher sought to identify knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions that may support nursing to promote improved health and health-seeking behaviors in this high-risk population.

Results.  No government-enforced standard protocols exist for health care providers to follow regarding prostate screening. Although 60% of health care providers stated having prostate screening discussions with their patients, over 55.6% of providers were not correctly utilizing informed decision making discussions with their patients. Personal interviews revealed 74.3% of the men stated that health care providers did not discuss prostate screening options with them, and although themes of fear, machismo, bedside manner, and homophobia were related by these men, 51.4 % stated they would have wanted to discuss their prostate risk. 80% of the men revealed that they would have done a full prostate screening exam if requested by their health care providers.

Conclusions:Jamaica has cost-effective prostate screening health care. Health care practitioners need to be better educated about informed decision making. Jamaican men were open to prostate screening but will not self-initiate. Feelings of fear, homophobia, machismo, and bedside manner must be addressed.

Back to top

Abstract

Willingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education, University Affiliation, and Nursing Students' Spirituality
Claudette Marie Spalding
Barry University, 2002
Dissertation Chairperson: Dr. Carol Patsdaughter

Nursing students provide care to a variety of patient populations and need to be aware of their own potential biases and comfort level when dealing with underserved and disenfranchised populations. As human beings, everyone prefers to care for or work with some clients/patients more than others. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. to identify relationships between select demographic variables (i.e., age, gender), educational variables, nursing students' spirituality, and willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations; 2. to specify the relative contributions of (a) select demographic variables, (b) level of education, (c) school affiliation, and (d) nursing students' level of spirituality to undergraduate and graduate nursing students' willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations.

A crosssectional correlational survey design was used. A convenience sample of 473 undergraduate and graduate nursing students was obtained at four purposively selected university settings (i.e., two religious universities and two secular universities). Data for the study were obtained through an anonymous survey. The survey consisted of (a) a demographic questionnaire with items addressing personal background and educational variables, (b) a 21item spirituality instrument with items on spiritual beliefs and involvement (Hatch et al., 1998) and two additional global indicators on spirituality and religiosity, and (c) a 50item willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations instrument (Spalding, 2002) which assessed the willingness of participants to deliver services to or provide care for members of 50 different populations or groups.

Data analysis consisted of (a) exploratory data analysis (i.e., inspection of frequency tables, histograms, and scale alphas if items deleted), (b) reliability estimates (i.e., Cronbach's alphas, Guttman's split half) for study instruments, (c) descriptive statistics and tests for group differences for demographic variables, and (d) descriptive statistics for major study variables as well as individual instrument items. Six study hypotheses were tested using bivariate correlations and multiple regression techniques.

Tests of study hypotheses yielded mixed results. Four hypotheses were supported by study data, and two hypotheses were not supported. Using multiple regression, the model was significant at each step, and the overall model was highly significant. However, only gender and spirituality were found to be significant ontributors to willingness to serve, and the five variables in the model explained only 5.8% of the variance in willingness to serve scores.

Back to top

Abstract

African American Women Living With Hiv/Aids: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Lonar Anthony Umadhay
Barry University, 2010
Chairperson: Dr. Jessie Colin

Background: African American women (AAW) account for the majority of new HIV/AIDS cases in the US (CDC, 2006). Although researchers have begun to examine important issues associated with AAW and HIV/AIDS, research delving into the indepth understanding of the complexities of their lived experience has been limited.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of AAW living with HIV/AIDS.

Methods: A qualitative method in the tradition of phenomenology provided the most meaningful platform for understanding the human experiences of AAW living with this disease. The research question "What is the lived experience of AAW living with HIV/AIDS?" was answered through semistructured, facetoface, audiotaped interviews that lasted no more than one hour. A purposive sample of 14 AAW over 18 years old who selfidentified as HIV positive and residing in South Florida were interviewed. Participants were contacted for a second onehour, facetoface meeting after data transcription for verification and member checking. The researcher used the hermeneutic phenomenological approach by van Manen (1990) that encourages use of a concurrent, continuous, and dynamic cycle. This cycle involves the process of describing, interpreting, and textual writing for data analysis.

Results: Three related themes of shattering self; constructing meaning, and empowering emerged through this phenomenological investigation. These themes vividly illuminated the totality of this experience filtered through these AAW's existential lifeworlds of space, body, time, and human relation. Starck's (2003) middle range theory of meaning provided a framework for gaining a deeper and more authentic understanding of this phenomenon.

Conclusion: The essence of this lived experience is a dynamic process that includes the initial shattering of one's view of self and the world, an attempt in reconstructing prior assumptions and finding meaning in a negative situation, and an empowering experience of being in control and achieving one's life purpose. Study findings illustrated the vital need for meaning construction through the suffering experienced by AAW with HIV/AIDS. Thus, for healthcare providers, understanding the deep level at which this experience affects AAW appears to be a fundamental precursor for the provision of effective and culturally sensitive support.

Back to top

Oh oh ....

We are sorry but it appears that JavaScript is disabled on your browser.
Our site is very interactive and it requires JavaScript to be enabled.
Click on the link below for instructions on how to enable JavaScript on your browser.

Enable JavaScript on your browser