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Yucatan Crippled Children's Project
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Barry Students Donate to Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project

The Hispanic Podiatric Medical Student Association (HPMSA) donated $550 to help support the mission of Barry University’s Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project (YCCP). The YCCP was established in 1996 to provide surgical and medical treatment to crippled children in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. For the past 14 years, physicians and surgeons from Barry University’s School of Podiatric Medicine have helped thousands of children who suffer from disabilities get back on their feet.

Marien Rodriguez, president of HPMSA and a member of the class of 2012 indicated that “HPMSA raised funds by selling lab coats and gloves, Spanish dictionaries and cards with medical phrases translated into Spanish, as well as holding a fundraising potluck dinner.” The HPMSA is a multicultural club that enables students from diverse ethnic backgrounds to learn about issues that affect practicing podiatric minority members and to help advance recognition of the podiatric profession. In addition, HPMSA advocates for awareness about health issues that affect minorities in the community.

Danielle Green (L) and Marien Rodriguez (R), HPMSA president, present Dr. Southerland a check for $550 to help with the Yucatan project’s mission.

Donations of $8,000 Made to Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project Commemorate 15 Years of Service

Barry University’s School of Podiatric Medicine (BUSPM) recently received a $5,000 donation from the International Foot & Ankle Foundation for Education and Research, (IFAF) formerly known as the Northwest Podiatric Foundation. The money will support the ongoing charitable medical missions of the Barry’s Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project (YCCP). Thanks to the YCCP, which is approaching its 15th anniversary, more than 6,700 crippled and indigent children of Yucatan, Mexico have been treated with the help of podiatric physicians and surgeons from the Barry’s School of Podiatric Medicine as well as podiatric physicians and surgeons from IFAF. The IFAF funds will be used by the YCCP to help buy supplies and equipment for future humanitarian trips.

Dr. G. Dock Dockery, chairman of IFAF, along with Dr. Byron Hutchinson, and the Board of Directors, recently traveled to the Yucatan as part of the medical team for the YCCP. Dr. Dockery presented Dr. Keith Kashuk, co-director of the YCCP, with the gift from IFAF. The donations were contributed by 31 friends and colleagues of Dr. Dockery, in his name, specifically for the YCCP.

In addition,  Magdalena Rosol, of Bako Pathology Services, presented Dr. Gary "Dock" Dockery, Chairman of IFAF, with a donation check for $3,000 for the Yucatan Crippled Children Project. The IFAF has been a long-time supporter of the Barry University Yucatan Crippled Children Project and Bako Pathology Laboratories is a major supporter of IFAF.
These generous gifts help commemorate the 15th Anniversary of the Project, which will be celebrated in Mexico July 13-17, 2011.  This trip will be the 70th mercy mission that Dr. Charles Southerland and his team have made to the Yucatan to assist indigent crippled children in that region.  According to Dr. Southerland, “We began this Project as a onetime trip in 1988 after Hurricane Gilbert ripped through the Yucatan. Fifteen years later, we are still helping one child at a time become whole again.  This Project could not carry on without the support of our generous sponsors.”  If you are interested in supporting the Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project, please contact Bob McKinlay at 305-899-3283.

Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project Receives $10,000 Grant from Lewis Foundation

The Barry University Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project has recently received a generous donation of $10,000 from the Frank J. Lewis Foundation of Riviera Beach, Florida.

The Yucatan Project, now in its ninth year of operation has rendered treatment to more than 4,500 crippled children in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico by podiatric physicians and surgeons affiliated with Barry University School of Graduate Medical Sciences.

The grant from the Lewis Foundation will support travel costs, medical equipment, and prosthetic devices for the crippled children.

Previously, the Lewis Foundation has provided Barry University with $115,000 to support the Project. According to Dr. Charles Southerland, founder and director of the Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project (YCCP), “as we near the 10th anniversary of the Yucatan Project I am reminded why I chose a career as a doctor. It is through the kindness of donors like the Frank J. Lewis Foundation, among others that we will be able to continue our mission to help poor crippled children to walk worldwide.”

To help the Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project please send your check made out to: Barry University SGMS, 11300 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, Florida, 33161, to the attention of the Office of Program Development. On the notation line please specify Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project..

Yucatan Project Receives Gifts from Lewis, Abraham, and Milagro Foundations

The Barry University Crippled Children’s Project (YCCP) has recently received $39,000 in grant support from generous donations from the Frank J. Lewis Foundation of Riveira Beach, Florida ($25,000), and the Milagro Foundation of San Rafael, California ($4,000), and the International Foundation, Fairfield, New Jersey ($10,000).

The Yucatan Project, now in its seventh year of operation has rendered treatment to more than 3,500 crippled children in the Yucatan, Mexico by podiatric physicians and surgeons affiliated with Barry University.

The grant from the Lewis Foundation will support travel costs, medical equipment, and medication to help the crippled children. Previously, the Lewis Foundation provided Barry with $90,000 to support the Project.

The grant from the Milagro Foundation will support costs of medical supplies and equipment for the Project. Last year, the Foundation provided $2,500 to support the YCCP.

The Milagro Foundation is a public foundation supported by the Deborah and Carlos Santana Family and its musical organization through funds generated by concerts, donations, revenues from Santana licensing fees, and generous individual and corporate donors.

The International Foundation grant of $10,000 will be used to support costs of medical equipment, surgical instruments, and medicines.

According to Dr. Charles Southerland, Director of the YCCP, “These magnanimous gifts have changed the lives of thousands of young, underprivileged crippled children.”

To help the Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project, send your check made out to Barry University SGMS, 11300 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, Florida, 33161, attention Office of Program Development with a notation to the Yucatan Crippled Children’s Project.

Barry University Yucatan Crippled Children's Project Receives Award

Barry University Yucatan Crippled Children's Project Receives Award Dr. Chet Evans, Associate Vice President and Dean, Barry University School of Graduate Medical Sciences (left) with Dr. Charles "Chip" Southerland, who received an award of, "Recognition for his altruistic and distinguished contribution to the field of Podiatric Medicine and especially the citizens of Progreso, based on his 7 years of dedicated service to Barry's Yucatan Crippled Children's Program," presented by the Mayor of Progreso, Mexico - Jose Luis Blanco Pajon.

Yucatan Project Seeks Funding Support

Yucatan Project Seeks Funding SupportSince July 4, 1996, Dr. Charles Southerland has led a team of physicians on a mercy mission to the Yucatan, Mexico to provide surgery for crippled indigent children. Now, Dr. Southerland needs your support.

More than 3,500 crippled children have received treatment and care from the flying doctors. The Project is in need of financial assistance to purchase vital medical equipment, medicine, other medical supplies, and travel. Without assistance the Project is in danger of postponing these life altering mercy flights.

Every other month two attending physicians and two residents volunteer their own time to conduct this humanitarian endeavor. With each trip the lines get longer and longer to see the doctors. The physicians spend 12 to 15 hours in surgery under grueling circumstances including lack of air conditioning, limited equipment, and other problems and issues.

Find out how you can help the Yucatan Project.