Physician Assistant

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Schedule a 1:1

About the Program Physician Assistant (Master of Clinical Medical Science)

Our vision is that our graduates will be PA leaders in health care technology and clinical practice.

The Barry University Physician Assistant Program educates students in the practice of collaborative medicine and encourages life-long learning and professional development. It fosters a technology rich environment and clinical training experiences among diverse patient populations. The Program enables students to develop competencies required to meet the health care needs of contemporary society.

The Barry University Physician Assistant Program is dedicated to producing ethical, caring, and well-prepared physician assistants. As a PA student, you will spend part of your training in underserved and disadvantaged communities, with an emphasis on primary care.  The Program also works to give you sufficient knowledge of scientific research design and statistics to read and intelligently interpret medical literature.

Barry University’s Mission includes the core commitments of knowledge and truth; inclusive community; social justice; and collaborative service which are reinforced in the program curriculum.

Barry University Physician Assistant Program:

  • Utilizes innovative technology to conduct instructional education via interactive videoconferencing (IAV).
  • Conducts a 40 hour total Immersion Medical Spanish course for all students.
  • Provides the opportunity for clinical rotations in diverse/underserved communities.
  • Contains a diverse student population within the two campuses.
  • Has strong affiliations with community hospitals and health organizations in Miami and St. Petersburg.
Course Curriculum What is a Physician Assistant?

All candidates who successfully complete the Program will be awarded the Master of Clinical Medical Science degree.

Physician Assistant Purpose Program Overview

The purpose of the Physician Assistant Program is to prepare well-trained health care providers who will extend and complement the capabilities of physicians in primary health care delivery. This purpose is accomplished in a responsive academic and clinical environment conducive to the pursuit of excellence in graduate medical science education, research, and community service.

The Barry University Physician Assistant Program educates students in the practice of collaborative medicine and encourages life-long learning and professional development. It fosters a technology rich environment and clinical training experiences among diverse patient populations. The Program enables students to develop competencies required to meet the health care needs of contemporary society.

  • 2014

    • The St. Croix campus matriculates its first class of 24 students.
    • Greg Burns becomes Operations Director in St. Petersburg and Valery Kepley become Operations Director in St. Croix.
    • Terry Helopoulos, the first Operations Director in St. Petersburg, retires after serving in the program for seven years. She remains a lab instructor.
    • Dr. Doreen Parkhurst, the first PA faculty member, is granted approval for sabbatical from September 2014 to March 2015.

    2013

    • The St. Croix campus is now fully staffed with three full time faculty members and four full time staff.  Construction of a second classroom is complete.
    • Use of electronic media for office and course materials reduces environmental impact.  All course materials available to students online.  The majority of testing is electronic based. 
    • The Program has long engaged in team building activities, retreats, seminars and assigned readings for faculty and staff.  Given the recent growth on three campuses, with many people who have never had the advantage of those activities, the Program has instituted refresher seminars in team building with the assistance of Barry University QIP.
    • The Class of 2015 matriculated and has enrollment in Miami Shores, St. Petersburg and St. Croix.  Their White Coat Ceremony was conducted using interactive videoconferencing on August 19, 2013.

    2012

    • The PA Program faculty conducted a one-day kick-off for the millennial task force Think Tank.  The faculty acknowledges that the learner has changed and the curriculum design needs to respond to future generations of students who are tech-savvy, multi-taskers with short attention spans.  A literature review of best practices in higher education was studied and discussed. 
    • Barry’s membership in the Pi Alpha National Honor Society continues to grow.  Pi Alpha is the national Physician Assistant honor society organized for the promotion and recognition of both PA students and graduates. Membership signifies the inductees' significant academic achievement and honors them for their leadership, research, community/professional service and other related activities. The society also encourages a high standard of character and conduct among students and graduates.
    • Ms. Evelyn Garcia was the recipient of the Sister Jeanne O’Laughlin Award presented during Barry’s Year End Celebration on April 27, 2012. 
    • Barry University is supporting an initiative to amend the PA Practice Act in the Virgin Islands to provide prescriptive privileges for PAs that will allow them to better meet the needs of patients across the islands.  The participation of citizens, government, physicians, PAs and others in this process demonstrates the inclusive community that is working together to meet basic human needs.
    • PA Program conducted its own Commencement Ceremony with three-way interactive videoconferencing between Miami Shores, St. Petersburg and St. Croix.
    • Several members of the PA Program faculty have published books, articles and/or presentations:  Physician Assistant Review (Surgery Chapter), The Evaluation of Physician Assistants’ History-Taking Abilities Using Actors as Standardized Patients, Predictors of Student Participation in Patient Care, and Evidence Based Admissions Screening Derived from Predicted PANCE Success.
    • In July efforts by the Barry University Physician Assistant Program culminated in the passage of new legislation governing PA practice in the U. S. Virgin Islands.  PA Program faculty testified effectively in support of the proposed law before the legislature of the Virgin Islands.
    • The School of Podiatric Medicine and Physician Assistant Program were treated to a luncheon sponsored by the Annual iGIVE Campaign on November 27, 2012 as a reward for 100% participation with a total pledge amount of over $24,000.00.

    2011

    • First - year students enroll in the expansion program on St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. Students began attending first-year didactic lectures delivered simultaneously between St. Croix, St. Petersburg and Miami Shores.
    • The PA program at Barry University simultaneously celebrated the first white coat ceremony for students in the class of 2013 at its new campus in the U.S. Virgin Islands and at its two other campuses in Miami Shores and St. Petersburg, Florida, through interactive videoconferencing.
    • Dr. Doreen Parkhurst, the Associate Dean and Program Director of Barry's Physician Assistant Program, talked about the Program with the Gov. Juan F. Luis Hospital Board’s regular monthly meeting.

    2010

    • Cultural competency component continues annually at new student orientation
    • The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded Barry University's Physician Assistant program $1.5 million in grants to address primary health care shortages in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI).  The first of the grants encompasses a one-year project of $273,332 to purchase equipment to establish video conferencing capability in the USVI.  The second grant of $1,223,615 is a five-year project to address primary health care shortages in the USVI through PA training.
    • The PA Program has been advancing exercises in Problem Based Learning to encourage active learning.  The faculty is scrutinizing the curriculum to accommodate the new learners who are adept at technology.  Presently all course materials are published on Canvas and all didactic testing is done electronically. 
    • Dr. Charles Culver, the first faculty member of the PA Program, retired.  During his tenure, he served at various times as Associate Program Director, Director of Self-Study and faculty member mentor for scholarly activity.  Dr. Culver was a Professor whose earlier career was at Dartmouth Medical School.  He is a highly acclaimed author of medical ethics articles and books.  He was instrumental in helping develop the early PA Program.

    2009

    • Program accreditation renewed for seven years by Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant; the maximum number of years the Commission will accredit physician assistant programs.
    • It was noted that the United States Virgin Islands (USVI) had no PA training programs, yet the entire territory is deemed medically underserved.  As part of its periodic mission assessment, Barry PA examined national health care trends and sent an advance team to the USVI to engage stakeholders on the feasibility of an expansion program in St. Croix.  
    • PA alumni continue to return to the Program as both core and adjunct faculty members, assisting with physical diagnosis labs and the Program’s annual primary care board review lectures.  PA alumni also act as preceptors for students in the clinical setting.
    • The Physician Assistant Program held its first videoconferenced White Coat Ceremony for the PA Class of 2011. The ceremony was held simultaneous at the Broad Auditorium in Miami Shores and at the University Partnership Center Digitorium on the St. Petersburg campus.
    • The Center for Community Health and Minority Medicine building project was completed this summer.  Courtyard landscaping touches were added during the Founders Week Paint the Campus Red celebration.

    2008

    • Travis Rogers, PA class of 2009 was the recipient of the national Physician Assistant Foundation Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded nationally on the basis of financial need, academic achievement, extracurricular activities, and future goals as a PA.

    2007

    • Ground breaking for the Center for Community Health and Minority Medicine
    • Program accreditation renewed for two years by Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant
    • PA Student Association was selected as the 2007 Outstanding Student Society in the country by the Student Academy of the American Academy of Physician Assistants
    • First graduating class including the expansion program at St. Petersburg, Florida as well as Miami Shores students.

    2006

    • Hurricane Wilma forces the SGMS into temporary quarters.
    • Lisa Wharry was awarded the Service Above Self Award by the North Miami Foundation for Senior Citizens for placements in service-learning experiences.
    • Second–year students enrolled in the expansion program at St. Petersburg, Florida began their first rotations on Florida’s west coast.
    • Division of Medicine established to include School of Podiatric Medicine and School of Graduate Medical Sciences

    2005

    • First - year students enroll in the expansion program at the University Partnership Center at St. Petersburg College in St. Petersburg, Florida. Students began attending first-year didactic lectures delivered simultaneously between St. Petersburg and Miami Shores.

    2004

    • Planning began for an expansion program serving place–bound students on Florida’s west coast.
    • The Physician Assistant Program was awarded over $475,000 for its third three–year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions to support distance education.

    2003

    • Fund - raiser in Palm Beach County for endowed student scholarship
    • Problem based learning component added to the curriculum
    • The Physician Assistant Program was awarded a one - year supplemental grant of $75,000 by the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions. This supplemented the existing grant awarded in 2001.

    2002

    • Program accreditation renewed for five years by Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant.
    • Service-Learning component added to the curriculum

    2001

    • The Physician Assistant Program was awarded a three–year grant of $439,917 by the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions. The Barry University Primary Care PA Training Project focused on the development of a Cultural Competency Curriculum and improved computer and online capability of the program. The major focus was delivery of primary care to rural, medically underserved and disadvantaged communities.
    • 100% of first - time test takers pass the national certifying examination.

    2000

    • Faculty planning retreat initiates periodic self–study
    • 100% of first-time test takers pass the national certifying examination.
    • Clinical students begin using PDA database to record patient encounters

    1999

    • Program granted full accreditation by Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
    • First graduating class

    1997

    • Program founded and provisionally accredited by Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
    • Program admits first students
  • As published by the AAPA, graduates of the Barry University Physician Assistant Program will be knowledgeable and competent in the following areas as expected by the PA profession:

    • Medical knowledge regarding the basic medical sciences and pathophysiology; the diagnosis and management of disease; and the promotion of health.
    • Interpersonal & communication skills involving verbal, nonverbal and written exchange of information, which results in effective information exchange with patients, patients’ families, physicians, professional associates, and the healthcare system.
    • Patient care that is effective, patient-centered, efficient and equitable in the treatment of health problems and the promotion of wellness.
    • Professionalism which emphasizes the practice of the values and ideals, which are embraced by the helping professions, and result in the practice of medicine in a manner that is ethical, sensitive to diverse patient populations and adhering to legal and regulatory requirements.
    • Practice-based learning and improvement in regards to the ability to engage in critical analysis of their own practice experience, medical literature and other information resources for the purpose of evaluation and improvement of patient care practices.
    • Systems-based practice which delivers the highest quality care at the most advantageous value, within the complex health systems providing medical care.
  • Program Goals Train competent medical providers with the knowledge and skills to provide patient centered care.

    Deliver a technology supported didactic and clinical curriculum that will prepare students to provide care to underserved communities.

    Develop lifelong learners through a curriculum that will enable them to search, evaluate and apply evidence to clinical practice.

    Provide experiences that enhance collaboration with diverse professionals united in caring for patients.

     

About the Program Accreditation

The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) has granted Accreditation-Continued status to the Barry University Physician Assistant Program sponsored by Barry University. Accreditation-Continued is an accreditation status granted when a currently accredited program is in compliance with the ARC-PA Standards.

Accreditation remains in effect until the program closes or withdraws from the accreditation process or until accreditation is withdrawn for failure to comply with the Standards. The approximate date for the next validation review of the program by the ARC-PA will March 2026. The review date is contingent upon continued compliance with the Accreditation Standards and ARC-PA policy. Click here to view the program's accreditation history.

Barry University Pass Rates Student Attrition Table

Physician Assistant Program Locations

Miami Shores Physician Assistant Program

Address

11300 NE 2nd Ave, Siena Bldg. 2nd floor, Miami, FL 33161

St. Petersburg Physician Assistant Program

Address

7200 66th Street North Pinellas Park, FL 33781

Experiential Learning Preceptors

A portion of the PA students' clinical training involves working in physician-supervised practices. To complete this aspect of PA training, Barry University depends on the generosity of active clinicians who assume the role of Clinical Preceptor and open their practices up to our students. By offering to serve as a Clinical Preceptor, you will be providing students the opportunities they need to build upon their knowledge and further develop diagnostic skills and clinical reasoning.

Barry University’s Physician Assistant Program is an intensive twenty-eight-month program for students seeking a Master of Clinical Medical Science degree. Our students will come to your practice with a solid foundation, having already completed a year of didactic and practical instruction.

After Barry PA students complete a year of clinical rotations, they move on to a final three-month didactic phase which provides them with an in-depth knowledge of scientific research design and statistics, and the analytical skills necessary to read and interpret the medical literature. The valuable clinical experiences they will gain under your supervision will enable them to successfully complete their education at Barry University.

If you are interested in participating in the education of Barry University PA students as a Clinical Preceptor, please complete the Preceptor Application email it to the Contract Specialist at paclinical@barry.edu. Additionally, direct questions to paclinical@barry.edu.

Preceptor Application
News

Top Stories

  • Nursing & Health Sciences

    Barry Grad Cameron Nicholson, PA-C, is Changing the Health Care Space for LGBTQ+ Patients April 13, 2021

    Cameron Nicholson knows firsthand the health care hurdles LGBTQ+ patients face. As a transgender man, he has been refused treatment by providers and found himself educating physicians about his care.

Physical Assistant Continuing Medical Education

The mission of Barry University College of Nursing and Health Sciences is to provide comprehensive continuing medical education to medical practitioners through appropriate learning activities. These activities will serve to develop or augment the knowledge, skills, and professional performance of health care providers as they provide services to patients, the public, and the profession. We will offer CME activities for physicians (DPM), athletic trainers, and physician assistants as well as other medical providers who wish to attend the programs. The goal of the CME program is to keep medical personnel abreast of current technological and medical advances in their field. Our offerings will include the following formats: lectures, audio and video taped programs, teleconferences, journal readings and internet programs.

The Physician Assistant Program offers an annual, five day review course specifically designed to assist physician assistant students and physician assistants in their preparation of the NCCPA certification and recertification exams.

Each attendee has the opportunity to earn AAPA Category 1 CME credits and fulfill the Florida state license renewal requirements for Prevention of Medical Error and Domestic Violence.

The course closely follows the NCCPA content blueprint in the selection of topics and overall organization to provide a well-structured review of the subject matter in the certification and recertification exams. The course also highlights the major aspects of primary care clinical medicine and will be useful for primary care physicians, family practitioners, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and students in all these disciplines.

Learn More

The goal of the CME program is to keep medical personnel abreast of current technological and medical advances in their field.

Grants

  • Primary Care PA Training Project

    In 2001, the Physician Assistant Program was awarded a three–year grant of $439,917 by the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions.

  • Distance Education PA Training Project

    2004: The Physician Assistant Program was awarded over $475,000 for its third three–year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions to support distance education.

  • Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) awarded Barry University's Physician Assistant program $1.5 million in grants to address primary health care shortages in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI).

Employment Opportunities

View Employment Opportunities

Physician Assistant Program Faculty & Staff

The odds are definitely in your favor at Barry University. Our student-faculty ratio is only 15:1. That means you get personal attention and guidance, and nobody gets lost in the shuffle. Even more impressive, over 80 percent of our faculty hold a PhD or the highest degree available in their field of expertise.

We seek out professors who are not only great teachers, but who love what they do. Their passion, enthusiasm, and inspiration are contagious, and there's no better way to keep young minds excited about learning and discovering. Beyond each teacher's area of expertise, our faculty is committed to promoting equality, social justice, altruism, diversity, and humility. Through education, everyone can have a voice.

Admissions Overview Getting Started

Congratulations on taking the first step to pursue your passion, advance your career, and make a difference in your community. We are committed to assist each student through the admission process.

Whether you transition straight from undergraduate studies to a graduate program or have been out of school for some time, we offer a welcoming and professional environment for graduate study.

With small class sizes, there is a considerable amount of personalized attention from your faculty and opportunities to build strong relationships with fellow classmates.

Program FAQs Admissions Requirements

Physician Assistant Program Insurance/Student Health Requirements

Upon entry to the PA Program, every student must have health insurance coverage which meets Barry University requirements, including coverage of occupational exposures and proof of listed immunizations and vaccinations.
Students are advised that faculty of the Program are prohibited by accreditation standards from providing health care services to students. Students must not seek health care from their didactic or clinical faculty.
  • Coverage must remain in effect at all times while enrolled in the Program. Graduate students taking six or more credits may purchase health insurance through the Barry University Health Plan. Students should review the coverage offered by the Barry University Student Health Services (BUSHC) online, myBarry, or by visiting the BUSHC. Students at distant sites may also email Pamela Foster (pfoster@barry.edu) enrollment forms and inquiries.

  • Prior to matriculation students must provide proof of their Barry University Health Plan enrollment or submit proof of their personal insurance by uploading to the American DataBank (ADB) Immunization Tracking System (ITS) at www.barrypa.com. In the event a change of insurance coverage occurs, the student must submit proof of the new plan. Students covered by an insurance plan other than the University plan must download an insurance waiver from the ADB portal, upload the completed form along with copy of the insurance card (back and front). Failure to submit proof of Barry University Health Plan coverage, or provide the waiver and proof of other insurance, will result in holds on registration and/or withdrawal from all clinical activities, with potential delays in progression through the Program.

  • Prior to the first day of new student orientation, each student must provide the Program (through the American Data Bank Immunization Tracking System) proof of compliance with Program student health requirements which will include a Statement of Good Health Form included in welcome pack). The costs are borne by the student.

  • The following list of vaccinations and immunizations are required prior to the first day of new student orientation. Each student must provide the Program (through the American Data Bank Immunization Tracking System) proof of compliance with Program student health requirements which include the listed vaccinations and immunizations. Proof includes documentation of series schedule and antibody titers. The costs are borne by the student.

    These health requirements are based in part on the CDC Guidelines for Health Care Workers which may change periodically:

    • Hepatitis B
    • MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)
    • Varicella (chickenpox)
    • Tdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis)
    • PPD status annually
    • Influenza annually

    Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Requirements
    (Adapted From CDC.GOV April 2018)

    • Hepatitis B: Give 3-dose series (done #1 now, #2 in 1 month, #3 approximately 5 months after #2). Give IM. Obtain anti HBs serologic testing 1-2 months after dose #3.
    • Influenza: Give 1 dose of influenza vaccine annually. Give inactivated injectable vaccine intramuscularly or live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) intranasally.
    • MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella): For healthcare personnel )HCP) born in 1957 or later without serologic evidence of immunity or prior vaccination, give 2 doses of MMR, 4 weeks apart.
    • Varicella (chickenpox): For HCP who have no serologic proof of immunity, prior vaccination, or history of varicella disease, give 2 doses of varicella vaccine, 4 weeks apart. Give SC.
    • Tdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis): Give a dose of Tdap as soon as possible to all HCP who have not received Tdap previously and to pregnant HCP with each pregnancy. Tdap given once regardless of when previous dose of Td was received. Give Td boosters every 10 years thereafter. Give IM.

    Key: IM- intramuscular/SC- subcutaneous

    Each student must update their PPD status and Statement of Good Health every 12 months, or more often if required by a clinical site to which the student is assigned. The above information may be released to third parties to facilitate student clinical placements.

    Further vaccinations may be required if recommended by the CDC.

Financial Aid Affordable for you.

At BarryU, our tuition is competitive, affordable and still promises all the perks of a private school education. Our cost per credit is in-line with other institutions, but we offer a mission-driven educational experience and provide our students with small class sizes, personalized attention, and academic excellence. Scholarships, graduate assistantships, and financial aid can also be explored to help offset overall costs.

Barry University participates in the full array of federal and state financial aid programs. At Barry, we are committed to doing all we can to help you finance your education.

Barry University's Financial Aid staff will assist you through the financial aid application process.

Financial Aid Programs

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees apply to all students regardless of campus. Specific fees and costs of attendance for the PA Program include:

Fees by Campus
Miami Shores
St. Petersburg
*Tuition (increased annually)

$ 35,175 per year

$ 35,175 per year*

Didactic Year Fees
$1,500
$1,500
Clinical Year Fees
$1,500
$1,500
Advanced Didactic Year Fees
$500
$500
Health Insurance Plan
$899-1911 (age based)
$899-1911 (age based)
Graduation Fee
$150.00
$150.00
***Technology Fee
$75 per semester
$75 per semester
Laptop computer
$1,350.00
$1,350.00
Medical Instruments
$1,100.00
$1,100.00
Books / Supplies
$4,425.00
$4,425.00
Criminal Background Checks and Drug Screens
$660.00
$660.00
Student Accident Plan (mandatory per semester)
$22.00
$22.00
**PDA or Smart Phone in clinical year
$500.00**
$500.00**
Clinical travel
$2500-3500
$2500-3500
***Transportation
$7,730
$7,730
***Living
$3,540
$3,540
***Room / Board
$24,000
$24,000

Tuition and fees apply to all students regardless of campus. Specific fees and costs of attendance for the PA Program include:

Fees by Campus
*Tuition (increased annually)
Miami Shores

$ 35,175 per year

St. Petersburg

$ 35,175 per year*

Didactic Year Fees
Miami Shores
$1,500
St. Petersburg
$1,500
Clinical Year Fees
Miami Shores
$1,500
St. Petersburg
$1,500
Advanced Didactic Year Fees
Miami Shores
$500
St. Petersburg
$500
Health Insurance Plan
Miami Shores
$899-1911 (age based)
St. Petersburg
$899-1911 (age based)
Graduation Fee
Miami Shores
$150.00
St. Petersburg
$150.00
***Technology Fee
Miami Shores
$75 per semester
St. Petersburg
$75 per semester
Laptop computer
Miami Shores
$1,350.00
St. Petersburg
$1,350.00
Medical Instruments
Miami Shores
$1,100.00
St. Petersburg
$1,100.00
Books / Supplies
Miami Shores
$4,425.00
St. Petersburg
$4,425.00
Criminal Background Checks and Drug Screens
Miami Shores
$660.00
St. Petersburg
$660.00
Student Accident Plan (mandatory per semester)
Miami Shores
$22.00
St. Petersburg
$22.00
**PDA or Smart Phone in clinical year
Miami Shores
$500.00**
St. Petersburg
$500.00**
Clinical travel
Miami Shores
$2500-3500
St. Petersburg
$2500-3500
***Transportation
Miami Shores
$7,730
St. Petersburg
$7,730
***Living
Miami Shores
$3,540
St. Petersburg
$3,540
***Room / Board
Miami Shores
$24,000
St. Petersburg
$24,000
*A limited number of tuition discounts are available. Additional late fee, late registration, tuition deferred payment plan and other fees may apply. Tuition, fees, and costs are subject to change. Tuition for in-state and out-of state residents is the same. Medical supply costs are dependent on personal selection of equipment. The Barry University Financial Aid office assists all students at all campus locations in obtaining financial aid. As part of an agreement between St. Petersburg College (SPC) and Barry University through the SPC University Partnership Center, the Program provides a 20% tuition discount to up to 4 students per year who are both accepted into the St. Petersburg student cohort and who graduated from SPC. **Students must purchase their own phone plan at additional cost. ***Rate set by University. Rate is subject to change.

Admissions Overview International Student FAQs

If you are an international student, applying as early as possible is in your best interest in order to allow ample time for immigration processing. Please be aware that admission to Barry University does not guarantee that you will be granted a student visa by the United States Embassy or Consulate in your country of origin.

View FAQs

Policies and Procedures

  • Screening and Documentation Requirements

    Due to various federal and state mandates concerning protection of vulnerable patient populations, Homeland Security requirements and anti-fraud initiatives by Medicare and Medicaid, students enrolled in clinical training programs across the nation face a number of fairly intrusive and costly screening and documentation requirements.

    Students matriculating into the PA Program will undergo a number of screening and documentation requirements. It is expected that this number will continue to increase beyond the present time. Among the various screening requirements are criminal background check(s) and random drug tests. The costs for these screens are borne by the student.

    Criminal Background Check

    Upon provisional acceptance to the program and annually, thereafter, all students whose education and training will involve participation in clinical settings are required to undergo a criminal background check. Students are responsible for all expenses related to meeting student health requirements and background documentation.

    Applicants who answer "no" to questions relating to criminal background in their CASPA application, who are later provisionally accepted and are found to have a positive criminal background check, are likely to be dismissed from the program on the basis of misrepresentation. In the event of a reported incident, a determination about the applicant’s/student’s continued progress in the academic program will be made by Barry University in accordance with School and University procedures.

    Applicants who have been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor may be denied certification or licensure as a health professional. Information regarding eligibility may be obtained from appropriate credentialing boards. Clinical rotation sites may not permit participation in the clinical experience. This should be considered seriously by the candidate prior to application and matriculation.

    Applicants are advised that results of criminal background checks and other required background screening will be released to third parties involved in their clinical education.

    Criminal offenses incurred after the student matriculates may result in the student’s dismissal from the program; if this occurs, tuition and fees will not be refunded.

  • Students are expected to dress professionally as outlined in the Didactic and Clinical Year Manuals.

    Visible studs and rings (face, tongue, lips, etc.) are to be removed during all clinical rotation activities. Tattoos are to be covered with clothing or other opaque material (cosmetics, Band-Aid) during clinical rotation activities.

  • A positive drug screen will result in reevaluation of the individual's fitness for retention or dismissal from the Program. Conditions for retention may include monitoring by appropriate health care professionals, regular surveillance of compliance with program policies, and drug testing, all at the student's expense.

  • Only the highest ethical and moral behavior should be evidenced by physicians and physician assistants. Behavior which is not of this caliber reflects poorly on the profession. Every student should aspire to the highest ethical standards daily. In the event there is an incident in which a student's integrity is questioned and is found lacking (such as breach of the dishonesty policy or patient confidentiality), the student will be re-evaluated for suitability in the PA profession and may be dismissed from the program.

  • Students are expected to comport themselves in a professional manner in the classroom, in clinical sites, on campus, and at all other times. Expected conduct is specified in the Barry University Student Handbook, Clinical Year Manual, this Graduate Catalog, and in syllabi and other materials distributed by instructors. Unprofessional behavior will be reported to the Program Director for consideration of disciplinary action.

    Statement on Professionalism Behaviors

    The physician assistant profession and PA education programs generally have an excellent reputation for instilling an appropriate sense of professional behavior in PA students and graduates. In order to foster and continue this tradition, the students and faculty of the Barry University Physician Assistant Program have cooperated in developing a system that addresses instances of both positive and negative student behaviors.

    Judgments of professionalism are often more qualitative than quantitative. The Barry University Physician Assistant Program relies on the sound judgment of its faculty in the assessment of student professional behavior. Early recognition of positive behaviors and elimination of unprofessional behaviors benefits the individual student, the student body and the program. It also helps avoid the possibility that a student might progress through the program with an adequate fund of knowledge and clinical skills, only to be found lacking in their ability to meet the program's technical standards or demonstrate the professional behaviors necessary for PA practice as a member of the health care team.

    When negative issues about professional behavior arise, the program encourages students and faculty, including preceptors, to informally address the student(s) involved in a non-confrontational dialogue. If the issue is resolved in this manner, it may be taken as a sign of success and professional maturity. If the issue or conduct recurs/persists, the individual(s) observing the negative conduct should fill out a referral form addressed to the student's faculty advisor. The advisor will then meet with the student to discuss the issue(s). The faculty advisor will then indicate the advisor's opinion on the reported issue and make written recommendations for corrective action in accordance with program policies, as set forth in the student handbook, graduate catalog and clinical year manual.

    Instances of conduct deemed to be negative and serious lapses will result in referral to the program director for administrative and/or disciplinary hearings. Repeated episodes of otherwise minor issues may serve as the basis of an early summative review of the student and/or referral to the program director to determine the student’s fitness to remain in the Program.

  • All didactic students are required to use laptop computers and should have them at the time of New Student Orientation. The Program makes syllabi and course materials available online. Developing computer skills is critical to the success of students in the Program and in practice. Students are expected to possess computer skills in word processing, email and internet browsing. Students will need to have internet access at their place of residence throughout the PA Program. This is necessary for communications, assignments, research and maximization of the learning experience.

    Barry University Physician Program does not require a specific brand of laptops.

    The laptop purchase program through Dell ensures that a laptop is affordable and allows a significant discount off of Dell's normal retail price. The machine incorporates all of the necessary features, speed, capacity, etc., that are required for the Program. Financing of the laptop is available through Dell. The laptops are configured with a software bundle and a three year warranty. They are supported by Barry University's Department of Information Technology. The minimum standard laptop computer specifications may be found at https://barryit.teamdynamix.com/TDClient/KB/ArticleDet?ID=28472.

    Developing computer skills is critical to the success of students in the Program and in practice. Though not a requirement for admission, students are expected to possess computer skills prior to matriculation. They are expected to have skills in word processing, email and internet browsing. Students will need to have internet access at their place of residence. This is necessary for communications, assignments, research and maximization of the learning experience. The Department of Information Technology (DoIT) is available to assist you.

    DoIT can be contacted at:
    help.barry.edu
    305-899-3604
    helpdesk@barry.edu

    1. Introduction

      Physician Assistant (PA) training is recognized as a broad-based process that requires the acquisition of general knowledge in all fields of medicine and of the basic skills required for the practice of medicine, regardless of specialty. The education of a PA in the Barry University Physician Assistant Program (BUPAP) requires assimilation of knowledge, acquisition of skills, and development of judgment through patient care experience in preparation for semi-autonomous and appropriate decisions required in medical practice. The current practice of medicine emphasizes collaboration among physicians, other allied health care professionals such as PAs, patients and families.

    2. Technical and Professional Standards

      1. The BUPAP Technical and Professional Standards (Standards), as distinguished from academic standards, refer to those physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities necessary for satisfactory completion of all aspects of the BUPAP curriculum. This includes the development of professional attributes required by the faculty of all BUPAP students by the time of graduation and for future practice as a certified and licensed PA.
      2. The BUPAP standards and essential functions of medical education shape the requirements for admission, retention, and graduation of applicants and students, respectively, at BUPAP. All graduates are expected to be qualified to enter a field of PA practice of their choice.
      3. Students applying to the BUPAP are selected on the basis of academic achievement, faculty evaluations, evidence of maturity, motivation, leadership, integrity, and compassion. Students must be capable of meeting the Standards described herein.
      4. The medical education process involved in the BUPAP focuses largely on the care of patients, and differs markedly from postsecondary education in fields outside of the health sciences. The primary responsibility for the selection of students and for the content of the curriculum rests with the BUPAP and its faculty.
      5. The PA role is, and must remain, a broad, undifferentiated role that produces graduates capable of supporting the full range of physician practice and patient needs. The BUPAP credentials awarded must attest to the acquisition of general knowledge in all fields of medicine and the basic skills requisite for the practice of medicine under physician supervision.
      6. Applicants are assessed without regard to sex, race, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, physical disability, or sexual preference. Admission to the BUPAP is competitive and is based on individual merit and performance within each applicant pool for a given academic year, and not on personal convictions, preferences, or happenstance of birth unrelated to academic performance.
      7. The Standards, along with the BUPAP policies, procedures and process for the admission and education of PA students, parallel, to some extent, those set forth by the Physician Assistant Competencies published by the ARC-PA, AAPA, NCCPA and PAEA, and inform and guide the decisions of the BUPAP faculty. All students of medicine, including PA students, must possess those intellectual, ethical, physical and emotional capabilities required to undertake the full curriculum and to achieve the levels of competence required by the faculty.
      8. The Standards are as follows.

        1. Observation

          The BUPAP curriculum requires essential abilities in information acquisition.

          1. The student must have the ability to master the course work presented in the form of lectures, written material and projected images. For many required tasks, observation necessitates the functional and mixed use of the sense of vision and other sensory modalities.
          2. Learning is enhanced by the functional use of the senses of smell and touch. The candidate must possess adequate sensation of vision, hearing, equilibrium, smell, taste, touch, pain, temperature, position, pressure, movement, stereognosis, and vibration, particularly when gross and/or subtle changes in symmetry are present.
          3. The student must have the cognitive abilities necessary to master relevant content in basic science and clinical courses at a level and pace deemed appropriate by the faculty.
          4. These skills may be described as the ability to comprehend, memorize, analyze, and synthesize material.
          5. The student must also be able to discern and comprehend dimensional and spatial relationships of structures and to develop reasoning and decision-making skills appropriate to the practice of medicine.
          6. Students must be able to perceive, by the use of senses and mental abilities, the presentation of information through small group discussions and presentations, large-group lectures, one-on-one interactions, demonstrations, laboratory experiments, patient encounters (at a distance and close at hand), diagnostic findings, procedures, and written material and audiovisual materials.
          7. Representative examples of materials/occasions requiring perceptual abilities in the first year include, but are not limited to: books, diagrams, discussions, photographs, x-rays, clinical case presentations, patient interviews and physical examinations, completion of cognitive and skills requirements for ACLS and PALS certification, and performance of suturing, casting, splinting, gowning, gloving, surgical scrubbing and establishing/maintaining sterile fields in the operating room setting.
          8. Additional examples from the second (clinical) year include, but are not limited to: physical exams; rectal and pelvic exams; examinations with stethoscopes, otoscopes, fundoscopes, sphygmomanometers, and refl ex hammers; verbal communication and non-verbal cues (as in taking a patient’s history or working with a medical team); live and televised surgical procedures; assisting at surgery and childbirth; x-rays, MRIs, and other diagnostic findings; online computer searches; and, responding to a wide variety of urgent and/or emergent patient presentations.

        2. Communication

          The student must have the ability to take a medical history and perform a physical examination. Such tasks require the ability to communicate with the patient.

          1. The student must be capable of perceiving the signs of disease or distress as manifested through the physical examination so these findings can be communicated verbally or in writing or both. Such information is derived from viewing and touching the body surfaces, palpable changes in various organs, and auditory information (patient voice, heart tones, bowel, and lung sounds).
          2. The student must be able to communicate effectively (in English) with patients and family, physicians, and other members of the health care team.
          3. These communication skills require the ability to assess all information, including the recognition of the significance of non-verbal responses and immediate assessment of information provided to allow for appropriate, well-focused follow-up inquiry.
          4. The student must be capable of responsive, empathetic listening to establish rapport in a way that promotes openness on issues of concern and sensitivity to potential cultural differences, and includes interacting therapeutically with psychiatric patients. In essence, this requires that the student be able to function, often in a fast paced environment, in order to:

            • * Elicit information
            • * Convey information
            • * Clarify information
            • * Create rapport
            • * Develop therapeutic relationships
            • * Demonstrate competencies
          5. The student must be able to skillfully process and communicate information regarding the patient’s status accurately and in a timely manner to the physician supervisors and all other members of the health care team. Complete, accurate information then needs to be communicated in a succinct, yet comprehensive manner, in settings in which the time available is limited. This may include, but is not limited to, participating in clinical rounds and conferences, oral presentations to physicians or other members of the healthcare team, written or dictated patient assessments and writing prescriptions.
          6. Appropriate communication may also depend on the student’s ability to make a correct judgment in seeking supervision and consultation in a timely manner, particularly in urgent and emergent situations.

        3. Sensory and Motor Function

          The student must have sufficient sensory and motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion, and other diagnostic maneuvers.

          1. The student will be required to coordinate both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of hearing, touch and vision.
          2. More specifically, the student must be able to exercise such fine motor skill as to adequately perform laboratory tests, including but not limited to, wet mount, urinalysis and gram stain.
          3. The student must exercise such level of dexterity, sensation and visual acuity as to competently and accurately complete such processes as administering intravenous medication, making fine measurements of angles and size, measuring blood pressure, respiration and pulse, performing physical examinations, and performing therapeutic procedures such as phlebotomy, EKGs, reading radiographs, suturing and casting.
          4. The student must be able to hear sufficiently to accurately differentiate percussive notes and auscultory findings, including but not limited to heart, lung, and abdominal sounds, as well as discern normal and abnormal findings using instruments such as tuning forks, stethoscopes, sphygmomanometers, and Doppler devices.
          5. A student must be able to transport himself or herself in a manner which provides timely response in both general and emergency care situations. Moving patients and engaging in some procedures requires the level of skill, strength and endurance necessary to perform the procedure(s) quickly, safely, effectively and for a reasonable period of time, often in a stressful environment.
          6. Examples of emergency treatment reasonably required of a PA are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the administration of intravenous medication, application of pressure to stop bleeding, the opening of obstructed airways, the suturing of simple wounds, and the performance of simple obstetrical maneuvers. Such actions often require simultaneous coordination of gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

        4. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities

          Students must be able to demonstrate higher-level cognitive abilities, which include:

          • * Rational thought
          • * Measurement
          • * Calculation
          • * Visual-spatial comprehension
          • * Conceptualization
          • * Analysis
          • * Synthesis
          • * Organization
          • * Representations (oral, written, diagrammatic, three dimensional)
          • * Memory
          • * Application
          • * Clinical reasoning
          • * Ethical reasoning
          • * Sound judgment
          1. Examples of applied cognitive abilities in the first year include, but are not limited to: understanding, synthesizing, and recalling material presented in classes, labs, small groups, patient interactions, and meetings with preceptors; understanding 3-dimensional relationships, such as those demonstrated in the anatomy lab; successfully completing oral, written, and laboratory exams; understanding ethical issues related to the practice of medicine; engaging in problem solving, alone and in small groups; interpreting the results of patient examinations and diagnostic tests; analyzing complicated situations, such as cardiac arrest, and determining the appropriate sequence of events to effect successful treatment; working through genetic problems.
          2. Additional examples of required cognitive abilities in year two include, but are not limited to: integrating historical, physical, social, and ancillary test data into differential diagnoses and treatment plans; understanding indications for various diagnostic tests and treatment modalities - from medication to surgery; understanding methods for various procedures, such as lumbar punctures and inserting intravenous catheters; being able to think through medical issues and exhibit sound judgment in a variety of clinical settings, including emergency situations; identifying and understanding classes of psychopathology and treatment options; making concise, prompt, cogent, and thorough presentations based on various kinds of data collection, including web-based research; knowing how to organize information, materials, and tasks in order to perform efficiently on service; understanding how to work and learn independently; understanding how to function effectively as part of a healthcare team.

        5. Behavioral and Social Attributes

          A candidate must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his or her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients.

          1. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress.
          2. They must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display fl exibility, and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients.
          3. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest, and motivation are all personal qualities that are assessed during the admissions and throughout the education processes.
          4. The student must be able to understand the basis and content of medical ethics.
          5. The student must possess attributes that include compassion, empathy, altruism, integrity, responsibility, and tolerance. (See Professional Behaviors, below)
          6. The student must have the emotional stability to function effectively under stress and to adapt to an environment that may change rapidly, without warning, and/or in unpredictable ways.

        6. Professional Standards

          All students of the BUPAP program must consistently display integrity, honesty, empathy, caring, fairness, respect for self and others, diligence, and dedication. Students must:

          1. Promptly complete all assignments and responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients (beginning with study in the first year);
          2. Develop mature, sensitive, and effective relationships, not only with patients but with their peers, all members of the BUPAP and university community and healthcare teams;
          3. Tolerate physically, emotionally, and mentally demanding workloads;
          4. Function effectively under stress, and proactively make use of available resources to help maintain both physical and mental health;
          5. Adapt to changing environments, display fl exibility, and be able to learn in the face of uncertainty;
          6. Take responsibility for themselves and their behaviors.

          Examples of professional behavior in year one include, but are not limited to: attending required experiences on time and prepared; displaying good personal hygiene and dressing according to program requirements; refraining from the abuse of alcohol and/or prescription drugs, and the use of illicit drugs; handing in assignments on time; refraining from plagiarizing or cheating; treating faculty, staff, and other students with respect; making an effort to understand prejudices and preconceptions that might affect patient interactions or collegial relationships (especially in the areas of race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, disability, age, and religious difference); developing successful working relationships with preceptors, staff, and peers by accepting constructive feedback and modifying their behavior accordingly.

          Additional examples of professional behavior in year two include, but are not limited to: maintaining a professional appearance and demeanor on service (e.g. white coat, name tag, appropriate attire, neat appearance, respectful speech, sobriety); representing oneself accurately; appreciating and preserving patient confidentiality; responding sensitively to patients’ social and psychological issues; developing empathic listening skills; understanding social biases and stigmas, and not reinforcing them; advocating for patients when appropriate; using hospital/clinic resources responsibly; showing up prepared and on time for rounds, lectures, conferences, and procedures; getting advice when handling ethical dilemmas; taking constructive feedback from attending physicians and residents with open-mindedness and the intention to improve; contributing to the effectiveness, efficiency, and collegiality of healthcare teams.

    Applicants are assessed without regard to sex, race, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, physical disability, or sexual preference. A strong affirmative action program is maintained in all of the admission entry routes. Applications are encouraged from students of medically-underrepresented minority groups.

    The medical education process involved in the BUPAP focuses largely on the care of patients, and differs markedly from postsecondary education in fields outside of the health sciences. The primary responsibility for the selection of students and for the content of the curriculum rests with the BUPAP and its faculty.

    1. Introduction.

      A student, who has a disability, as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, does not mean the student is not qualified to study and practice medicine in the BUPAP. To be qualified for the study of medicine in the BUPAP, students must be able to meet the academic, technical and professional standards, with or without a reasonable accommodation.

    2. Process for Assessing Disabilities and Reasonable Accommodations.

      1. No inquiry will be made on the application forms concerning a disability. BUPAP policies regarding technical abilities and skills necessary to meet the competency requirements are published and available on the BUPAP website and referenced in its literature, and included with the letter of admission. Students and candidates are encouraged to review the competency requirements.
      2. Students accepted for admission to BUPAP who believe they require a reasonable accommodation for any medical condition must contact Barry University's Office of Accessibility Services ("OAS") so that OAS can determine if the medical condition is a disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Part of OAS' review of whether or not a student has a disability includes a requirement that the student submit supporting documentation regarding the disability from a qualified health professional. The health professional must also provide an opinion on the student's ability to meet the BUPAP Standards with or without reasonable accommodations. It is the responsibility of the student to provide a complete set of the BUPAP Standards to the qualified health care provider before the opinion is rendered.
      3. A reasonable accommodation is viewed as a means of assisting disabled students with meeting essential standards by providing them with an equal opportunity to participate in all aspects of each course or clinical experience (a reasonable accommodation does not, however, guarantee that students will be successful in meeting the requirements of the course or clinical activity).
      4. Whether or not an accommodation is reasonable will be determined on an individual basis. Determining what is a reasonable accommodation is an interactive process between the disabled student, OAS, and Graduate Medical Services ("GMS"). OAS will discuss the reasonableness of the accommodation with GMS (which is typically the Vice-President of Medical Affairs or his/her agent) in light of cost to Barry University and the Standards described herein. Any disagreements between OAS and GMS regarding whether an accommodation is reasonable under current federal and/or state law should be addressed with Barry University's Office of Legal Affairs.
      5. All students accepted into the BUPAP must sign a statement that they have read, understand and are able to meet the BUPAP Standards, with or without reasonable accommodations. The Standards apply to all phases of the BUPAP, including admissions, matriculation and graduation.
      6. Although a disability may ultimately prevent some candidates or students from meeting the BUPAP Standards, the BUPAP is committed to providing any and all reasonable accommodations that will assist disabled students in entering and successfully completing the BUPAP.
  • The graduate catalog is published annually. This page contains the most recent information about the Program changes that will appear in the next catalog.

A complete description of our policies and procedures may be found in the graduate catalog.

2021-2022 Physician Assistant Graduate Catalog

Sign in to use the pins