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Accessibility Services

Division of Academic Affairs

OAS Contact Information

How do I Get Started?

To get started, request accommodations through the OAS.

Supportive documentation MUST be uploaded as part of your request.

Once you submitted the request for accommodations, a member from the OAS will contact you to schedule an intake appointment. To ensure that students receive the accommodation needed in a timely manner, and due to advance planning requirements for housing-related accommodations, the following deadlines have been stablished:

Accommodation Request Form

To request housing accommodations:

  • i-knowledge-and-truth

    Returning students

    April 1st

  • i-knowledge-and-truth

    New students starting Fall semester

    June 1st

  • i-knowledge-and-truth

    New students starting spring semester

    November 1st

Maintaining Confidentiality of Student Disability Information

The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) at Barry University treats all student information with the strictest confidentiality. The information we have about students are mostly educational records and are thus governed by The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) guidelines. However, documentation of a disability often includes psychological or medical reports that fall under the category of health information. The OAS does not meet criteria as a “covered entity” under the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), but we will nevertheless protect student information by following both FERPA and HIPAA guidelines. Specifically:

  • All records are maintained in a secure electronic medical records program. Documents that have been scanned and saved to the secure program are shredded.

  • All paper records containing student information are kept in locked file cabinets. The rooms containing the file cabinets are locked when the office is closed.

  • Routine communication about a student with faculty or other members of the Barry University community will not reveal information about a student aside from acknowledgment that the student is receiving services through the OAS and the nature of the accommodations that the student is entitled to.

  • When a staff member of the OAS needs to communicate with a third party beyond routine communication (as described in item three above), we will obtain a Release of Information (ROI) by which the student grants permission for information about them to be shared.

  • All OAS Staff receive training about confidentiality and are required to sign a Confidentiality Agreement.

  • Records are maintained for seven years, after which time they are deleted and/or shredded.

Emotional Support Animal (ESA) Policy

In general, pets and animals are not allowed on the Barry University campus or in the residence halls. An exception to this rule is if an animal is an Emotional Support Animal (ESA).

An ESA is a pet that provides therapeutic support or comfort to an individual who has a documented disability. The animal does not have to have specialized training, but must be able to alleviate one or more symptoms of a disabling condition. The Fair Housing Act (FHA) sets the regulations related to ESAs. The FHA stipulates that an animal kept in residence is a reasonable accommodation if: 

  • the student has a disability;
  • the animal is necessary to afford the student an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling;
  • there is an identifiable relationship or nexus between the disability and the assistance the animal provides.

Following are the Barry University Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) policies for students who require an ESA:

  • The student must be registered for services with the OAS at Barry.
  • The student must provide to the OAS documentation from a healthcare provider explaining that there is a connection between the student’s disability and the use of an ESA, and that the student will not be able to use and enjoy the residences at Barry if the animal is not permitted. A form to facilitate this documentation is provided, and must be updated at the beginning of each academic year during which the student plans to have an ESA in his/her dormitory.
  • ESAs are only allowed in the residence halls.
  • Policies related to ESAs in the residence halls are stipulated and strictly enforced by Housing and Residence Life. After the accommodation to have an ESA is granted by the OAS, students must check with Housing and Residence Life to be apprised of their policies.

How Do I Document My Disability?

Documentation requirements vary according to each student’s disability and situation. If documentation of a student’s disability is needed, it should be provided by a licensed professional who has relevant experience and has no personal relationship with the individual being evaluated. In general, that professional should provide information to establish the existence of the student’s disability, describe the nature of the disability, explain the limitations of the student, and offer accommodation recommendations.

Please note that a letter from your healthcare provider stating your diagnosis and that you are entitled to accommodations is not sufficient. It is also important to keep in mind that while your healthcare provider should make accommodation recommendations, his/her recommendations are suggestions. The appropriateness of those recommended accommodations will be determined by the Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) Director. Therefore, you may not be granted the accommodations that your healthcare provider specifies.

Rights of Students With Disabilities in Higher Education

What Every Student With Disabilities Should Know Transitioning From High School to College

If you are a student with a disability, you have rights at a post-secondary institution such as a college or university. It is important to be well informed about those rights, and to also understand that you play a critical role in advocating for yourself. This document is provided to give you an overview of your rights and responsibilities as you transition from high school to college. Much of the information here comes from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights.

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disability Act of 1990 (Title II) are the laws that govern how students with disabilities are to be treated. These laws state that post-secondary institutions cannot discriminate against students with disabilities, and also specify that institutes of higher education are required to provide accommodations to students with disabilities.

How To Use Our Services

Use your accommodation memo: 

After meeting with the OAS Director and providing appropriate documentation of your disability, you will be given an Accommodation Memo specifying your accommodations. The Memo is addressed to “The faculty of your name here.” Each semester that you are enrolled at Barry you present your Memo to faculty teaching courses in which you want to use your accommodations. If you find that you need to alter or add accommodations, you can meet with the OAS Director to discuss such changes.

If you take your tests at the OAS:

Tell the OAS when you are coming to take a test:

Podiatry students are required to complete a Testing Reservation Form every Monday, informing the OAS of the testing accommodation services needed for the upcoming week.

Assistive Technology for Barry Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities sometimes require computer software, devices, or other technology. The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) is committed to assisting students to obtain the technology and devices they need for optimal academic performance.

In general, the OAS does not provide technology or device support to students for personal or professional use.

However, there are times when the nature of a student’s disability requires that s/he have such access to technology in order to function well at Barry. The Director of the OAS will work with students who have such circumstances to evaluate what is needed and to help the student obtain the software, device or mechanical support s/he requires.

Testing Policies and Procedures

The following are testing policies and procedures to be aware of while using your accommodations:

  • It is your responsibility to let the University know that you have an upcoming assessment. You do this by completing the Testing Reservation Form through the OAS web page. The form must be submitted at least two (2) days before the assessment is scheduled.
  • Your assessment will be scheduled during normal class time when possible. It is important that you arrive at least 5 minutes before your assessment. Please note the end time will not be extended even if you arrive late.
  • When you arrive to take your assessment you will be asked to leave your items with an administrator. All personal belongings will be returned upon the completion of the assessment.

How Does Having a Note Taker Work?

Please see the steps below on how to download your class notes from DropBox once they have been uploaded.

  1. Log in to DropBox using the following information:
    • Website: www.dropbox.com
    • Username and Password will be provided each semester by the Dean of Students’ Office
  2. Once logged on, you will be able to see a listing of courses.
  3. Click on the link with the name of the course from which you wish to download notes.
  4. Click on the link of the notes for the day(s) you are downloading.
  5. Click on the blue “Download” button and save the file(s) to your system.

** An important note about the Student Conduct Code: Please note that it is in your honor to download the document(s) for your course only. You do NOT have permission to peruse the other files nor download any other documents. Students who break the rules in this regard are subject to disciplinary action under the Student Conduct Code. **

I Want To Appeal My Accommodations

The staff of the Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) work diligently to serve students well and to ensure that they receive every accommodation they are entitled to have by law. There are times, however, when a student is denied an accommodation they desire and the student wishes to challenge the decision to exclude that accommodation. Under these circumstances, the student should follow the following appeal process:

  • Discuss your concern with the Director of the OAS in an effort to resolve the problem.

  • If discussion does not resolve the problem to your satisfaction, inform the Director in writing that you wish to appeal his/her accommodation decision.

  • The Director will present your written request to the Associate Vice President (AVP) of Mission and Student Engagement who oversees the OAS.

  • The AVP of Mission and Student Engagement will render a decision about the accommodation.

  • Any further appeal should be made to the Vice President of Mission and Student Engagement, who will follow procedures set forth by the Barry Executive Committee of the Administration (ECA) and Board of Trustees to address the matter.

Anti-Retaliation Policy

The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) is committed to upholding all statutes that prohibit discrimination in education, including Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008.

Students who file complaints or grievances against an employee or unit of Barry University, including the OAS, will not be retaliated against by the staff of the OAS. Neither previous nor current complaints or grievances will factor into OAS decisions made about the student or OAS services provided to the student. Retaliation against a student in response to a complaint or investigation will not be tolerated.

Request Forms

Podiatry Students

How to use our Services

Assistive Technology for Barry Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities sometimes require computer software, devices, or other technology. The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) is committed to assisting students to obtain the technology and devices they need for optimal academic performance.

In general, the OAS does not provide technology or device support to students for personal or professional use.

However, there are times when the nature of a student’s disability requires that s/he have such access to technology in order to function well at Barry. The Director of the OAS will work with students who have such circumstances to evaluate what is needed and to help the student obtain the software, device or mechanical support s/he requires.

Testing Policies and Procedures

How Does Having a Note Taker Work?

I Want to Appeal My Accommodations

Anti-Retaliation Policy

Biomedical Sciences Students

How to use our Services

Assistive Technology for Barry Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities sometimes require computer software, devices, or other technology. The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) is committed to assisting students to obtain the technology and devices they need for optimal academic performance.

In general, the OAS does not provide technology or device support to students for personal or professional use.

However, there are times when the nature of a student’s disability requires that s/he have such access to technology in order to function well at Barry. The Director of the OAS will work with students who have such circumstances to evaluate what is needed and to help the student obtain the software, device or mechanical support s/he requires.

Testing Policies and Procedures

How Does Having a Note Taker Work?

I Want to Appeal My Accommodations

Anti-Retaliation Policy

School of Law Students

How to use our Services

Assistive Technology for Barry Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities sometimes require computer software, devices, or other technology. The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) is committed to assisting students to obtain the technology and devices they need for optimal academic performance.

In general, the OAS does not provide technology or device support to students for personal or professional use.

However, there are times when the nature of a student’s disability requires that s/he have such access to technology in order to function well at Barry. The Director of the OAS will work with students who have such circumstances to evaluate what is needed and to help the student obtain the software, device or mechanical support s/he requires.

Testing Policies and Procedures

How Does Having a Note Taker Work?

I Want to Appeal My Accommodations

Anti-Retaliation Policy

For Faculty

What are my Obligations to Students With Disabilities

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 protect students with disabilities from discrimination. Everyone in the Barry community is obligated to uphold those laws, but there is a particular onus on faculty to abide by the Rehabilitation Act and ADA because most efforts to avoid discrimination of students with disabilities come in the form of academic accommodations.

If you are notified by the Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) that a student in your class has been granted academic accommodations, you are required to provide those accommodations. If, however, you have misgivings about the accommodations granted or feel stressed by your obligation to provide accommodations, you should contact the OAS Director to talk about your concerns. We are here to partner with you and help you meet your obligations with as little inconvenience to you as possible.

OAS Notification in Faculty Syllabi

All faculty syllabi should have a statement indicating the faculty member’s commitment to providing reasonable accommodations to students with a disability, and information about how students should pursue getting accommodations.

How Do I Solicit for a Note Taker?

May Students Have Animals in Class?

Checklist for ADA Compliance for Online Courses

Universal Design

Universal design (also known as inclusive design) is a term given to a range of ideas intended to make the environment inherently accessible to all people, especially people with disabilities. For example, universal design refers to architectural features such as dropped curbs for wheelchairs.

The term universal design has also been applied to curriculum. Universal Design Learning (UDL) proposes that instructional methods, materials, and assessments be designed to play to everyone’s unique needs. The three main guidelines of UDL are illustrated on the next page in an image from the UDL Center.org (http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudlcenter).

Additionally, universal design refers to the way we create documents to be accessed, especially by students who use assistive technologies like screen reader software. Making a document accessible is easy. Tutorials can be found on the internet/youtube. Essentially, you use the “Word Styles” on the “Home” tab (the right-hand side of the menu) on Microsoft Word. If you do so, your documents will have a common structure. Here are the basics:

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