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Dean of Students

Division of Mission and Student Engagement

Dean of Students

The Office of the Dean of Students serves as a resource to the entire University community through its efforts to meet the educational and developmental needs of students related to community standards, conflict management and resolution, civility, and respect for self and others.

Members of the campus community must act out of mutual respect to establish an atmosphere of trust.

Therefore, Barry University expects its members to treat one another with sensitivity, consideration, understanding, tolerance, and an active concern for the welfare of others.

Some of the services offered by the Office of the Dean of Students include advocating for all students, educational programs, faculty-student collaboration, conflict resolution, and the disciplinary process.

Contact Information Mission Statement

  • Barry

    Student Advocacy

    Sometimes you might need a little extra help in navigating the departments of the University or with personal issues. Let the staff at the Dean of Students Office assist you.We encourage you to come by the office with any issues or concerns you may have. Our goal is to promote student learning and academic success. To assist you along the way, let us provide you with information and contacts for services and resources offered at Barry.No matter how big or small your question or concern is, we'll be happy to help.

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    Disciplinary Process

    As a Catholic and Dominican university, Barry stands for the dignity and worth of every person. We believe, therefore, in values that foster the human respect needed for people to live, work, study, and recreate together as a community. The student discipline system exists to handle violations of the University's rules and regulations. This system is based on a philosophy of fairness for all parties concerned in any situation involving non-compliance with a University policy or regulation.

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    Educational Programs

    Throughout the academic year, the office offers programs offering information on topics of importance to students. All students are urged to attend these programs. They are a good way to learn about and share solutions on issues that affect college students. Some of these issues include: alcohol awareness, drug awareness, sexual assault, domestic violence, time management, and personal safety.

  • Barry

    Complaint Process for out of State Distance Education Students

    Out-of-state distance education students who have completed the internal institutional grievance process and the applicable state grievance process, may appeal non-instructional complaints to the FL‐SARA PRDEC Council. For additional information on the complaint process, please visit the FL‐SARA Complaint Process page.

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    Faculty-Student Collaboration

    Through the office, you have the opportunity to get involved in programs during which you will collaborate with faculty. Some of these programs include the Mentor Program, University committees, and community service opportunities.

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    We Are Here To Serve You

    The Office of the Dean of Students provides support for the intellectual and personal development of all students – undergraduate, graduate, and adult learners – through a combination of advocacy, programming, and services that enhance the quality of campus life.

Dean of Students Alcohol and Drug Education

Barry University is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe campus community that fosters student learning, growth, and achievement. In keeping with this commitment, the Office of the Dean of Students works closely with faculty, staff, student leaders and others, to foster a campus culture that emphasizes responsible alcohol and drugs decision-making.

We support a culture that promotes drug and alcohol abuse prevention and that emphasizes reduction in harm and negative outcomes for students. We provide programs that emphasize responsible choices and offer alcohol-free alternative programs for students who choose not to drink.

Additional Resources

Dean of Students Mediation

Mediation is a problem-solving process facilitated by an impartial third person, who is called the mediator. The role of the mediator is to help students identify issues that are important to each of them, communicate their ideas, explore options, reduce misunderstanding, discover areas of compromise, negotiate differences, and optimally come to mutually agreeable solutions.

Mediation allows the participants to design solutions that are best for their situations.

The mediators are members of the Dean of Students Office who have completed state-approved mediation training and have experience in mediating student disputes in a variety of contexts. They are committed to providing high quality service to all Barry students in dispute.

Download Mediation Submission Form

To initiate your own mediation:

    1

    Fill out the Mediation Submission Form.

    2

    Bring a printed copy to the Office of the Dean of Students in Landon 101.

    3

    Contact Ms. Lexey Freeman at 305-899-4926 or deanofstudents@barry.edu.

  • 1

    Fill out the Mediation Submission Form.

  • 2

    Bring a printed copy to the Office of the Dean of Students in Landon 101.

  • 3

    Contact Ms. Lexey Freeman at 305-899-4926 or deanofstudents@barry.edu.

Dean of Students Sexual Misconduct

As a Catholic, Dominican University, Barry is committed to providing the best possible setting for carrying out its educational mission. An essential component of this environment is an atmosphere in which all members of the University community have an equal opportunity to work, to learn, and to develop. The Division of Mission and Student Engagement, in an effort to educate students and others, provides programs throughout the year that focus on individual responsibilities regarding sexual misconduct and how to avoid, confront, report, and eliminate it from the campus environment.

These University policies and guidelines are established for students who seek information and assistance should they be a survivor of, accused of, or a witness to sexual misconduct. It is the University’s desire to create a supportive climate that will encourage individuals to report incidents of sexual misconduct. The Policy on Sexual Misconduct is designed to achieve the following goals:

  • Provide compassionate and prompt support services
  • Provide a comprehensive framework in which the needs and decisions of all parties concerned are center in determining further administrative response and assistance.
  • Create a campus environment that both facilitates and expedites the prompt reporting of sexual misconduct.
  • Cultivate a climate of community empowerment and education in which behaviors that contribute to sexual misconduct are not tolerated.
Who Can Help

Reporting Sexual Assault

The University encourages the reporting of all incidents of sexual misconduct. Deciding whether to report an incident is a personal and often difficult decision. Reporting sexual assault is often the beginning of a process by which victims regain control over their lives.
Reporting sexual assault may also help in preventing future incidents and establishing a precedent that will aid other victims in the future. It is important to understand the options available for reporting an incident of sexual assault. The following options are available

Dean of Students By-Stander Intervention

Bystanders are the largest group of people involved in violence – they greatly outnumber both the perpetrators and the victims. Bystanders have a range of involvement in assaults. Some know that a specific assault is happening or will happen, some see an assault or potential assault in progress, and some know that assaults do happen. Regardless of how close to the assault they are, bystanders have the power stop assaults from occurring and to get help for people who have been victimized.

Take the example of the typical perpetrator of college sexual assaults. Most are men who are outwardly charming, have a lot of friends, and don't consider their actions to be wrong (Lisak, 2002). People who know this person (bystanders), and are potentially friends with this person, often do not want women they care about (sisters, friends, etc.) to date or hang around this man. When his behavior is directed at other women whom they are not close to, they often do not think it is a situation in which they need to get involved.

Bystanders often know that this person’s behavior is inappropriate and potentially illegal, but may not know what they can do to make a difference.

We have all been bystanders in our lives, and we will all be in situations where we are bystanders in the future. The choice, then, becomes whether we are going to be active bystanders who speak up and say something, or whether we will be passive bystanders who stand by and say nothing.
We are not advocating that people risk their own safety in order to be an active bystander. Remember, there is a range of actions that are appropriate, depending on the situation. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, calling 911 is the best action a bystander can take.

As opposed to being the bystander who stands by and does nothing, we want to create a culture of bystanders who are actively engaged in the prevention of violence.

Additional Bystander Intervention Strategies

Has anyone stopped a friend from going home with someone when the friend was drunk or high? Has anyone tried to stop a friend/teammate/peer from taking advantage of someone or doing something else inappropriate? Both of these actions are examples of bystanders using their power to stop violence.

What else can bystanders do to make a difference?

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    Believe your Friend

    Believe someone who discloses a sexual assault, abusive relationship, or experience with stalking or cyberstalking.

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    Be Respectful

    Be respectful of yourself and others. Make sure any sexual act is OK with your partner if you initiate.

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    Help Others

    Watch out for your friends and fellow Buccaneers – if you see someone who looks like they are in trouble, ask if they are okay. If you see a friend doing something shady, say something.

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    Speak Up

    If someone says something offensive, derogatory, or abusive, let them know that behavior is wrong and you don’t want to be around it. Don’t laugh at racist, sexist, homophobic jokes. Challenge your peers to be respectful.

  • Care

    Get Involved

    Apply to be a peer educator, volunteer (we could include information here to campus resources), or join another campus or community group working on these issues.

Dean of Students The Student Emergency Relief Fund

The Dean of Students is able to assist students who experience unplanned financial emergencies through the Student Emergency Relief Fund. This fund is available to assists all students (resident and commuters) experiencing unexpected expenses due to difficult circumstances that hinder their academic progress. Limited to a specific dollar amount, in most cases, these funds will not cover the entire cost of an event or emergency. 

Any funds awarded should be viewed as an assistance to help lessen the impact of the emergency. All students requesting funding will be required to meet with or speak to a staff or faculty member who will be able to file the request on behalf of the student. Staff and faculty advocating for a student who may be eligible for assistance through this fund may apply.

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